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Budgets on the Rise at Paris Shows

Accessories buyers trolling the Who’s Next Paris, Première Classe and Bijorhca Paris fairs in mid-January said their budgets were flat to up.

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PARIS — Accessories buyers trolling the Who’s Next Paris, Première Classe and Bijorhca Paris trade shows here in mid-January said their budgets were flat to up on the same prior-year period.

That was the case for Nevena Borissova, founder of the Curve boutiques, who was shopping for pre-fall and eye-catching pieces “not wildly spread on the American market.”

“I’ll probably spend 10 to 15 percent more than last year,” she said.

Budgets were larger, too, for Tsum accessories and jewelry buyer Maria Dontsova, who had placed an order with Carlo Zini at Bijorhca.

“It’s [got] a lot of bling, a lot of crystals. Usually that’s what our girl is looking for — they like all the bling,” said Dontsova, adding she was also in the market for clutches and fine cashmere hats and scarves.

“We’re looking for a lot of clutches and minaudières with [plenty] of crystals,” continued Song Haldeman, head of buying office research and account manager for Harvey Nichols Hong Kong, who said budgets for the season were “stable” versus January 2012.

Griffin Chan, buyer for Harvey Nichols Hong Kong, added they were also scouting out resources for men’s clutches and formal bags. Jewelry-wise, the duo would see Bernard Delettrez at Première Classe.

Attendees from nastygal.com were hoping to expand the site’s handbag and jewelry offer. “We’re looking for more structured shapes,” said Camilla Zecchetto, nastygal.com’s nonapparel buyer. These could include top-handle satchels with futuristic details like holograms “or just interesting materials or hardware,” she explained.

They were keen on “statement piece” jewelry, continued Christina Ferrucci, buying director for the site. A brand of interest was Andrés Gallardo, which creates porcelain pieces with animal and floral motifs.

Among labels showcasing larger silhouettes at Who’s Next and Première Classe was Alienina, whose heavy cord jewelry handmade in Italy is primarily composed of recycled materials. Sveva Collection was displaying its colorful, hand-stitched embroidered crystal creations.

For winter accessories, such as scarves and hats, the Inverni, Valeur and Epice stands were bustling.

Designer Zoe Lugo exhibited some of her latest Zoe Style Design Art bags, which are made of Andean fique, among other materials.

Over at Bijorhca, Helen Zeal, director of Hummingbird London Ltd. consultancy, noted among jewelry trends vintage, friendship bracelets in more metal work, Africa-inspired pieces, variations on the cocktail ring and a larger selection of drop earrings.

Chantal Manoukian displayed her La Tonkinoise jewelry collection whose one-of-a-kind creations include old and recycled elements. Jennifer Dewavrin highlighted her Paola Zovar creations replete with interchangeable stones.

Lamai’s resin jewelry resembles porcelain with hand-drawn or -painted, nature-inspired decor and Peggy Bannenberg presented her 3-D printed jewelry, some of which was in titanium.

Murat, whose sales are primarily generated domestically, in France, has set its sights abroad now, according to Sonia Balay, who is in charge of marketing and communication at the company. Among its models shown were voluminous pieces in silver made with electroforming.

“People are still always fond of novelty,” she said.

Attendee traffic was down at the trade fairs. For Who’s Next Paris, which for the first time broke out its accessories section and placed it next to Première Classe, among other changes including the creation of a Mr. Brown Accessories segment for men, registered a 1.4 percent dip in visitors to 57,838 versus the same prior-year session. While some found the new layout confusing, others said it was clear.

“It’s more convenient for buyers now, because they put everything together,” maintained Harvey Nichols’ Haldeman.

Attendee footfall at Bijorhca Paris declined 9.4 percent against the January 2012 edition to 12,302.

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