Loquita: A Label With a Message

Sara Rotman's label, which launched with silk and cashmere scarves last year, is expanding for holiday with a range of duffels and totes.

As Sara Rotman sees it, everyone deserves to have “a little f–k you on the inside.”

This story first appeared in the July 11, 2011 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

That was the genesis of her label Loquita, which launched in March 2010 with a small selection of silk and cashmere scarves, many of which were printed with the words “F–k You.”

“It’s like a little private moment — I’m being a little naughty. Outwardly, I’m doing my job properly, but on the inside, I’m a little, you know….” said Rotman, who does not bother to hide her irreverence, a stylish combination of large-scale tattoos, flaming orange lipstick, designer shoes and profanity. She has no shortage of energy, which she pours into professional polo — Rotman owns six horses and is the only woman on her team — and to her 11-year-old creative agency ModCo Creative (short for My Own Damn Company). There, her client roster has included Tory Burch, Vera Wang, Carolina Herrera and Kim Kardashian, and provided a segue into design for Loquita, which is large on color and graphic print, Rotman’s signatures.

Loquita is expanding for holiday with a range of duffels and totes, which wholesale from $22 to $116 for the weekend, and has been picked up by Nordstrom. Done in coated canvas with leather trim, many styles bear polo-inspired motifs, such as the phrase “When in Doubt, Gallop.”

Rotman’s production partners on the collection are Jay Adoni, David Giordano and Kenny Horowitz of PLV Studio (Pour La Victoire, Kelsi Dagger). A Loquita shoe collection is planned for spring.

As a branding expert, Rotman knows the value of a distinct message and identity. Loquita translates to “little crazy girl” in Spanish. “It’s a nickname my Argentine friends” gave me for being an independent woman,” she said. “They’re like, ‘Loquita, you drive your own car and you have your own polo team, you have two businesses — Loquita.’ It’s not meant to be disparaging. It’s meant as a celebration.”