Couture Jewelry Show: Ones to Watch

A few names expected to make news in Las Vegas.

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A few names expected to make news in Las Vegas.

This story first appeared in the May 30, 2013 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.


Designer Colette Steckel will launch her Africa collection — 100 one-of-a-kind pieces inspired by a monthlong trip she took last summer — at Couture.

For the range of studs, larger earrings, pendants, necklaces and men’s cuff links, she combined white and blackened 18-karat gold, diamond accents, fossils and geodes with stones including vintage purple and Argentium turquoise, bumble bee jasper, frosted onyx and pink tourmaline.

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Inspired by zebras, lions, Botswana’s Okavango Delta and views of the desert from the plane, the collection retails from $1,500 to $20,000. Designing for about 15 years, Steckel opened her first freestanding unit in Mexico City in 2000, and will open a second there in about a month.

NEXT: AS29 >>


AS29 designer Audrey Savransky describes her jewelry as “diamond accessories,” and for her first time at Couture, she will unveil a range of Spine pieces in addition to her signature Wings collection.

“I wanted to do a Twenties- or Thirties-esque item, but with a very modern twist. It’s very Art Deco — I just imagined it [in a] more rock ’n’ roll chic punk [way] by adding the black-and-white diamonds,” said the Belgian-born, Hong Kong-based Savransky, describing a long wing ring that retails for $4,460. The line retails from $2,000 to $25,000 and predominantly includes 18-karat gold and white, black, gray, yellow and green diamonds.

It launched five years ago in Europe and is now sold at retailers including Harrods, Harvey Nichols, Liberty, Le Bon Marché, Printemps and Colette.

NEXT: Sorellina >>



Sisters Kim and Nicole Carosella will unveil their first collection — a combination of predominantly white, rose and yellow gold and blackened silver stackable rings, earrings and necklaces with diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds — at Couture.

Most of Sorellina, which means “little sister” in Italian, generally retails from $2,000 to $5,000, with statement pieces up to $11,500.

“While on vacation in Belize, I went kayaking through a mangrove. There was something fantastical about the world under that canopy, full of different types of flora and fauna,” said cofounder Kim Carosella about the line’s standout: the Puccini Cage group, comprising earrings, a ring and a cuff — a $25,000 palladium cage with varying shades of gold and diamond butterflies inside. “We don’t view it as butterflies trapped in cages, but as butterflies living in a magical, enclosed world.”

NEXT: Coomi >>


Coomi’s new Arrowhead group is made from 20-karat gold, diamonds and ancient arrowheads dating back to 5000 BC. Starting this fall, the 24-piece line, ranging in price from $5,000 to $65,000, will be available at Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth Avenue.

“Growing up in [Mumbai, India], life was about spirituality and symbols. Our early human ancestors communicated via symbols and art, found today in prehistoric caves and sculptures,” said founder Coomi Bhasin. The line has grown an average of 35 to 40 annually for the past five years, and the average retail sale has risen by $10,000 since 2010.

While visiting a fellow collector, the designer was fascinated by a collection of prehistoric arrowheads from ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia and the Indus Valley, and she bought the arrowheads.

A 20-karat arrowhead pendant with a “Lucy” skeleton design on agate with rose-cut diamonds retails for $22,000.

NEXT: Wendy Yue >>


Wendy Yue is keen on high-impact pieces.

The designer will showcase an expanded selection of her jewelry, famous for its heavy use of precious and semiprecious stones, for her third appearance at Couture.

Her pieces range from $8,000 to $150,000 at retail. Among the pieces is a magnolia collar fashioned from 18-karat gold, vivid tsavorites, diamonds and pink and yellow sapphires, retailing for $45,000.

Yue founded her Hong Kong-based atelier 15 years ago and manufactures jewelry for her own line as well as other brands. She launched the first collection under her own name in 2008.

Carried in the U.S. at Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus, Stanley Korshak and Marissa Collections, the designer opened her first freestanding door last month in Hong Kong.

NEXT: Ivanka Trump >>


Ivanka Trump Fine Jewelry will make its Couture show debut this year, introducing the largest collection — about 85 pieces spanning four groups — since the line’s inception in 2007.

“They are feminine, polished styles with a sense of youthful modernity. I design for myself and the self-purchasing female,” Ivanka Trump said in an interview at the brand’s headquarters at Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue. “We tend not to be overly trend-focused. We are modern, but design-focused.”

Currently, Trump maintains a boutique on Mercer Street in SoHo and is carried in 55 U.S. doors and 20 internationally. Her first freestanding unit in China just opened, and she plans five more in the region with a partner over the next three years. They will be in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Macau and elsewhere in Mainland China. This significant international expansion began about 18 months ago, and Trump counts Saudi Arabia, Dubai and Kuwait as key growth areas. Multiple doors carry Trump’s jewelry in Bahrain and Abu Dhabi, and the royal family of Qatar is also a supporter.

The brand’s tassel and mixed-cut diamond group is a strong seller, with a sweet spot of $2,000 to $10,000. Bigger-ticket items, from $300,000 to $500,000, consistently sell in the Middle East as well. However, Trump wanted to develop more transitional day-to-evening pieces at more accessible prices. There’s an emphasis on the $1,200-to-$5,000 range, like a black onyx and diamond ring at $1,550. She predicts her Art Deco-inspired “Metropolis” group, heavy on brushed gold and diamonds, will be another strong seller.

“We can deliver more gold and pass on that value,” Trump said. A lot of jewelers want to stay in margin and not [change prices with the fluctuation in gold prices].”

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