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Annick Goutal: A Blooming Business

NEW YORK -- Business is flowering for Annick Goutal. <BR><BR>The company, which successfully launched two limited-edition floral scents earlier this year, is doing a third: Honeysuckle, which will become available in April.<BR><BR>"It's a very light,...

NEW YORK — Business is flowering for Annick Goutal.

The company, which successfully launched two limited-edition floral scents earlier this year, is doing a third: Honeysuckle, which will become available in April.

“It’s a very light, elegant fragrance that’s suitable for both men and women,” said Brigitte Taittinger, president and director general of Annick Goutal. “It’s a very fresh scent with a youthful, spring-like attitude.” The juice includes — naturally — honeysuckle, with a hint of Turkish rose and jasmine. “Annick loved rose and jasmine, so many of our scents include a hint of them,” said Taittinger.

Taittinger, whose family acquired the rights to the company from Annick Goutal in 1988, is continuing to work with Goutal’s daughter, Camille Goutal, and her former assistant, Isabelle Doyen, in developing fragrances. She calls Camille “the spirit,” and Doyen “the nose.” Goutal, who founded the company in 1981, died in August of 1999 after a lengthy struggle with cancer.

The company’s previous two limited-edition scents were La Violette, a violet-scented juice, and Le Muguet, a lily-of-the-valley fragrance. In the U.S., La Violette was a Nordstrom exclusive, while Le Muguet was a Saks Fifth Avenue exclusive. Both were designed to appeal to the traditional Goutal audience, while also attracting a younger customer. Unlike the previous limited-edition scents, however, Honeysuckle will be in the brand’s complete U.S. distribution of about 350 doors, which include Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Bergdorf Goodman and Nordstrom.

Connie Ruscio, vice president and general manager of Fragrances Exclusive, which took over American distribution of Annick Goutal fragrances from AdiPar in July, is expecting “great things” from Honeysuckle. “It’s a gorgeous scent with a widespread appeal, and we know it’s going to do great business,” she said.

A 1.7 oz. bottle will retail for $65, and will be on-counter for about three months. Industry sources estimate that the scent will do about $1 million at retail globally.

Honeysuckle isn’t the only item on the Annick Goutal plate right now. The company is celebrating its 20th anniversary with a limited-edition version of its existing Eau d’Hadrien scent. The bottle, a numbered crystal Baccarat flacon, is engraved with the Annick Goutal logo and topped with a spire-like cap. “It was inspired by the art and architecture of imperial Russia from the early 20th century,” explained Julie Rhinehart, executive director of marketing for Fragrances Exclusive. Three hundred bottles will be sold globally this season. In the U.S., they are available in Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bergdorf Goodman and Bloomingdale’s and retail for $700.