WWD.com/beauty-industry-news/beauty-features/beauty-radar-screen-september-3-2009-2254966/
View Slideshow

Hair Fare: A Snapshot of This Season’s Launches

From indie hair care brands to stalwarts like L’Oréal, there is a raft of directional new lines and product ranges launching during the late summer and early fall.

For starters, hair care brand Living Proof will follow the success of its debut treatment line, No Frizz, with No Frizz Shampoo and Conditioner, $24 each. Both utilize polyfluoroester, a molecule discovered by a team of Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers, which claims to eliminate the cause of frizz. The molecule, which replaces silicone as the line’s primary humectant, is designed to coat hair strands and reduce friction among them.

“We want to fundamentally deliver results better than anything out there,” said Rob Robillard, chief executive officer of Living Proof. “Everything we do is about solving problems with new materials.”

In August, Malin+Goetz introduced Moisturizing Shampoo, $25, Gentle Neroli Shampoo, $20, and Intensive Hair Mask, $25, which are all designed to repair and restore damaged hair. The items join the brand’s best-selling peppermint shampoo and are intended to be gentler and suitable for all hair types.

“This is calming and soothing for the scalp and is an alternative to the peppermint fragrance,” said Matthew Malin, co-founder of Malin+Goetz. The shampoos contain extracts of grapeseed, panthenol, meadowfoam and hydrating amino acids, while the five-minute mask contains wheat proteins, plant extracts and almond for shine.

Earlier this summer, author and curly hair guru Ouidad introduced her first tool, the Double Detangler. The ergonomically designed, tiered comb purports to painlessly brush through knots in wet or dry hair.

“The teeth are wide enough to detangle without putting stress on the hair,” said Ouidad, who goes by only one name. “Hair passes through the first comb and is lined up for the second.”

The stylist, who favors using fingers to brushes or combs for detangling added, “It causes no damage; [it] detangles but keeps hair in its own condition.” The $24 comb is carried at Sephora. Also this summer, L’Oréal-owned Matrix’s newest Vavoom Design Pulse line is designed to target a young, hip consumer looking for texture and versatility. “Right away you get a cool rock ’n’ roll feel,” said artistic director Ammon Carver of the three new citrus-scented stylers, Loosely Defined Texture Créme, $16, Messy Couture Molding Paste, $16, and Glow to Pieces Shine Wax, $16. “This is for the consumer who likes different looks, one day sleek and the next something more edgy,” said Carver. Design Pulse, which hit salons in late summer, is infused with styling polymers designed for hold and styling flexibility.

John Masters Organics’ newest treatment item, Honey & Hibiscus Hair Reconstructor, rolled onto shelves at Whole Foods in August. In addition to honey and hibiscus, the conditioning formula features soy protein, kelp extract and cupuaçu butter.

“When hair is smoother, it is reflecting more light,” said John Masters, owner and founder of the brand. “It will also improve hair volume and reduce static electricity.” Retailing for $28, Honey & Hibiscus Hair Reconstructor is meant to be used as a once-weekly treatment or after every shampoo for more damaged hair.

French beauty company Pierre Fabre is launched new products in August under its René Furterer and Klorane brands. A volumizing hair collection called Volumea will join the René Furterer portfolio and offer styling as well as treatment benefits. The line, which includes a leave-in foam, $23, a strand-thickening shampoo, $23, and a no-rinse conditioning spray, $26, is designed to visibly increase hair strand volume by 11 percent. Key ingredients include natural carob extract to coat and plump the hair shaft and an antihumidity cationic polymer.

Meanwhile, Klorane has reformulated and repackaged its Pomegranate line, which features the antioxidant-rich fruit and a mild cleansing base intended to protect color from fading. Nate Lawton, brand manager for Herbal Essences said of the brand’s newest line, Tousle Me Softly, “Girls like to have those natural, free-flowing touchable waves and this helps her create and hold the look and manage it in a way that it doesn’t fall apart.”

The range includes a shampoo and conditioner, mousse, hair spray and spray gel, each priced at $2.99, as well as a finishing cream to reduce flyaways and complete the bed head-inspired look.

Later this month, hair treatment brand Moroccanoil will introduce a shampoo and conditioner infused with argan oil as the key ingredient. Moisture Repair Shampoo, $18, and Moisture Repair Conditioner, $19, will fill in a gap for basic cleansing and conditioning within the line, said Carmen Tall, co-founder and executive vice president of marketing and new product development. “These are the first in a series of four shampoos and conditioners we’ll be launching in the next few months,” said Tall. In addition to argan oil, the items contain avocado oil, silk amino acids and plant extracts.

Also in September, L’Oréal Professionnel will present a technology designed specifically for weak, damaged hair. “It’s patented to work on the inside of the hair to protect and fortify,” said Paul Schiraldi, vice president of marketing. “The technology actually rebuilds the hair’s infrastructure,” he claimed.

The five new products, ranging from a Leave-in treatment, $19, to an Anti-Breakage Masque, $30, feature amino-acid rich royal jelly and a medley of vitamins intended to guard against sun and heat damage.

Industry sources expect the new line to ring up $1 million from September to December and $5 million to $6 million in 2010.

Aetó Botanica’s Reviving Drops, launching in September, combine the purported benefits of a deep conditioning salon treatment but is designed for at-home use.

“The scalp has to be pure and balanced for it to grow healthy hair,” said Guita Dovas, president of Oloff Beauty, which distributes Aetó Botanica in the U.S. “This is essentially a multivitamin of red seaweed, calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, vegetables,” Dovas added.

“These active ingredients are pure, certified organic and will strengthen hair, restore vitality, shine and hydration,” she claimed. The 12 vials, which retail for $60, are available in salons and on beautypantry.com.

NEXT: Nail Color Goes Emerald >>

Turning Green

The go-with-everything black nail color is becoming green with envy, as more and more manufacturers unveil shades matching a freshly mowed lawn.

From Chanel’s holiday mint to MAC’s nearly onyx, fall shades explore a bevy of interpretations of the classic color. “The black nail has been in fashion for so many seasons now it’s become more of a wardrobe staple, it’s no longer shocking and gothic,” said Nonie Creme, co-founder and creative director of Butter London, a high-end fashion-forward nail brand.

Inspirations behind the gamut of verdant hues range from Orly’s Once Upon a Time Collection, which conjures up a feeling of fairy tales and fantasy, to Lippmann Collection’s blue and green mood ring. “It’s about taking a safe color [green] and turning it on its ear by wearing it on the nail,” said Creme. About her own hand-mixed shade, British Racing Green, Creme said “this green calls back to a late Eighties preppy moment, a velvet slipper, black watch plaid,” she said. “It’s a little bit of an emotional journey.” The shade, which graced fingertips at Vena Cava’s fall runway show, is now part of her line’s permanent collection. “My gut is telling me the green trend is going to carry forward.” NP2 is an emerging New York-based line of polishes that fuses color with a base and top coat in one stacked bottle, instead of having two components in separate containers. NP2 interprets green’s sci-fi side in Atomic, a sparkling emerald, and Cosmic Ray, a multidimensional peacock green.

“Green is confidence and a feeling of serenity,” said Essie Weingarten, founder and president of Essie Cosmetics, who will introduce Mint Candy Apple in November. “It has a dual message. We think of prosperity, environment and it’s a fashion statement crossing over in clothes and accessories.”

Beauty Radar Screen is a weekly WWD Beauty feature which runs every Thursday on WWD.com.

 

View Slideshow