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Celebrity Fascination To Continue

What do Britney Spears, Sean "P. Diddy" Combs, Jennifer Lopez, Sarah Jessica Parker, David Beckham, Kimora Lee Simmons and Enrique Iglesias have in common, other than being famous?

NEW YORK — Quick: What do Britney Spears, Sean “P. Diddy” Combs, Jennifer Lopez, Sarah Jessica Parker, David Beckham, Kimora Lee Simmons and Enrique Iglesias have in common, other than being famous?

Answer: Every single one of them is contributing something new to the celebrity fragrance category this fall.

Call it the new star wars. A genre popular in the Eighties, celebrity scents made a full-blown resurgence after Jennifer Lopez and her fragrance licensee, Lancaster, launched Glow by JLo in September 2002. After Glow by JLo racked up first-year global sales of $100 million, stars began entering the category faster than you could say “big fat royalty check.”

Lopez, Parker, Simmons and Beckham, along with Celine Dion, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, Victoria Beckham and Shania Twain are all signed to Coty for its Coty and Lancaster divisions. Spears was snapped up by Elizabeth Arden, which also has a development deal with Elizabeth Taylor (not to mention a spokeswoman gig for Catherine Zeta-Jones). The Estée Lauder Cos. has Sean “P. Diddy” Combs, Enrique Iglesias, Beyoncé Knowles and Donald Trump in its stable of scent stars, while Parlux does Paris Hilton’s products. As well, Alan Cumming has a deal for an eponymous fragrance brand with Christopher Brosius.

And there’s no end in sight. Indeed, it seems that the industry is simply getting started.

“My feeling is that this trend is going to last as long as celebrities do — I don’t see it ending, only accelerating,” David Wolfe, creative director for Doneger Creative Services, said in June. “Anybody who crosses the celebrity radar is in a viable position these days to do a fragrance, given the public’s overwhelming appetite for stars. What it’s saying is that the consumer has no sense of self-identity. The same thing is happening in apparel — everyone wants the style of a celebrity.”

This story first appeared in the July 8, 2005 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.