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Catherine Malandrino transformed her spring showcase into a global safari Tuesday afternoon, grouping girls into sects hailing from regions as far flung as the Sahara and the Sudan, to the Andes and Polynesia. And nowhere was the designer’s ethnic inspiration more evident than the hair created by Laurent Philippon on behalf of Bumble and bumble.

“Catherine was really inspired by four different ethnic groups,” he said, twisting hair into an African-style updo. “The first group is Sudanese-inspired, and I love this hairstyle because it is very African, but at the same time it has a punk twist to it with this Mohawk-shaped bun on top.” To achieve this, Philippon used Bumble’s gluelike gel, called Gelac, taking little sections of hair and twisting them until they arrived at a bun on the top of the head.

To evoke Saharan Nomads, Philippon transformed girls’ hair into actual turbans, creating a “very dry texture” in strands before applying styling wax. To give hair a sandy desertlike vibe, he finished off the Saharan look with a generous amount of hair powder.

Polynesian natives were articulated though hair that was worn long, natural and wavy. Bumble and bumble’s Prep was sprayed throughout hair, before it was braided into “two fat” sections, blown out and left to cool. “Then we brushed it out for this very healthy, beautiful wave,” said Philippon, who mirrored Peruvian Tribes for the final grouping with two thick braids that were sewn together at the bottom.

“Disjointed makeup,” according to lead artist Tom Pecheux, who was working on behalf of MAC Cosmetics, was also meant to echo the “ethnic tribal” origin of the clothes. “Catherine wanted to have a real connection with the makeup,” he said.

To do this, products were applied with fingers for “a rough look” that was predominantly matte. Eyes stood out thanks to a dark palette ranging from browns to blacks, and a lot of mascara. MAC’s Feline Pencil was smudged inside the eyes.

Pecheux applied a combination of MAC’s PRO Sculpt Powders to blush the apple of the cheeks, using his finger. “We did it very badly so it would look and feel like a sunburn.” The brand’s chestnut lip pencil — a brownish-red lip color — was also rubbed in with fingers for a desertlike hue.

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

<p>Backstage at Malandrino RTW Spring 2010</p>

Photo By: Thomas Iannaccone

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