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The Scent of J.Lo

PARIS — Jennifer Lopez is adding juice to her already larger-than-life career.<br><br>The actress-singer-dancer has been involved in each step leading to the creation of her much-hyped fragrance, called Glow. It has two main targets: The primary...

PARIS — Jennifer Lopez is adding juice to her already larger-than-life career.

This story first appeared in the July 5, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The actress-singer-dancer has been involved in each step leading to the creation of her much-hyped fragrance, called Glow. It has two main targets: The primary one is 15- to 25-year-old women and the secondary is 10- to 15-year-olds.

Lopez (aka J.Lo) is considered to be the ultimate person to speak to young people, who until now haven’t been specifically addressed by Coty Inc.’s Lancaster Group Worldwide, owner of her beauty license, according to its executives.

“J.Lo is totally tapped into the young generation,” said Catherine Walsh, senior vice president, international marketing, cosmetics and American licenses for Lancaster. Walsh said her firm has opted to build a fragrance brand around the J.Lo persona, since it has become synonymous with a hip, musical, streetwise woman.

In addition to that, Lopez’s acclaim could help Lancaster’s U.S. volume spike dramatically — from the approximate 20 percent to 22 percent it comprises today — said Lancaster’s president, Michele Scannavini.

Lopez’s project “is an excellent fit overall in our company strategy of creating lifestyle brands that make a difference in the marketplace,” explained Bernd Beetz, chief executive officer of Coty Inc.

Glow is expected to ring up strong sales. While Lancaster executives refused to divulge estimates, industry sources believe the scent could bring in $25 million to $30 million in wholesale volume its first year.

For the fragrance’s juice, Lopez chose a fresh sexy clean scent reminiscent of freshly washed skin. Glow’s juice, created by Quest, includes neroli, orange blossom and pink grapefruit in the head; rose, sandalwood and amber in the middle, and soft musk, jasmine, orris and vanilla in the base.

As for the fragrance’s name, “Jennifer Lopez’s skin glows,” explained Walsh. “We wanted to get across this idea of a glow.”

Lopez went for a curvy, asymmetric shape for the bottle, whose reference to a torso and hips cannot be missed. It was created in-house of a matte glass and has “Glow by J.Lo” written around the spray, plus a signature rhinestone J.Lo insignia dangling from the neck.

The exterior packaging has a soft touch.

Glow will launch exclusively on Aug. 1 in travel retail through Lufthansa. Then, starting Sept. 1, the scent will be introduced in 16 markets, including the U.S., where it will be in 2,000 doors, plus Canada and Latin America. A progressive rollout will include six more countries, starting in March 2003.

Michael Thompson lensed the ad visual, which features J.Lo and the bottle. The tag line reads: “It’s the glow.” Select’s Olivier van Doorne was the campaign’s director.

At launch, the ad will break as single and double pages, plus four-page inserts, among other formats. There will also be sampling, including some half-million Liquatouch samples attached to the best-selling stockkeeping units in Lopez’s fashion line, plus TV and cinema campaigns.

In the U.S., the fragrance will launch as 50- and 100-ml. eau de toilette sprays, for $38 and $50, respectively. Elsewhere, a 30-ml. size will also be available and retail for about $28.60, converted at current exchange rates from the euro. There will be two ancillaries on counter at launch.