PARIS — Selective Beauty, the Paris-based beauty manufacturer and distributor, announced that 2007 sales were up 24 percent year-on-year, to 188 million euros, or $258 million at average exchange.

That showing represents the company's seventh consecutive year of double-digit growth, the firm stated Friday.

The company, which holds worldwide fragrance or beauty licenses for brands including Agent Provocateur, Jimmy Choo and Benetton, said it is targeting a similar performance for 2008.

Upcoming product launches include signature women's and men's scents for Iceberg, which, as reported, will bow in March and July, respectively, as well as a Trussardi fragrance, which will hit stores in April.

Selective Beauty, which signed an 11-year licensing deal with John Galliano last year, will introduce the designer's debut fragrance in the fall. The beauty firm is rolling out MaxMara Le Parfum, a women's scent, internationally.

— Ellen Groves

Urban Decay Taps Cory Kennedy

LOS ANGELES — Urban Decay has named a known commodity, style blogger Cory Kennedy, for its spring marketing campaign.

Four images featuring Kennedy, who rose to fame as Los Angeles party photographer Mark "The Cobrasnake" Hunter's paramour and muse, are hitting Urban Decay displays at Sephora and Macy's doors this month. The shots also are featured on the Newport Beach, Calif.-based brand's Web site.

Lensman Gyslain Yarhi shot the campaign and makeup artist Robin Schoen handled the beauty looks, which are centered on Urban Decay's vivid, loose pigment eye shadows.

"She [is] pushing the edge of culture, fashion and design, and we are trying to do that with our brand, as well," Wende Zomnir, Urban Decay's co-founder and executive creative director, said of Kennedy, who she initially considered for Urban Decay after spotting her on Nylon magazine's September cover.

Urban Decay, which is owned by Falic Group, has opted against choosing a face for the brand for more than a single season, a strategy that Zomnir indicated would likely continue. "We always try to rotate our models," she said. "Our customer is so multicultural and multifaceted and different. It is important for us to show different aspects."

 

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