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GlamGlow: Mud Goes Hi-Tech

The brand broke into 153 Dillard’s doors last month and, on Aug. 16, will roll out to 110 Sephora doors, with an additional 29 expected in October.

The GlamGlow product.

GlamGlow is muddying the world, albeit, glamorously.

The brand entered Neiman Marcus, Harrods and nordstrom.com last year on the strength of a single product — its Tingling & Exfoliating Mud Mask containing green tea leaf pieces, volcanic rock and French sea clay — and has spread to retailers in 27 countries. But it saved its biggest U.S. retail launches for this year: GlamGlow broke into 153 Dillard’s doors last month and, on Aug. 16, will roll out to 110 Sephora doors, with an additional 29 expected in October.

GlamGlow founders Glenn Dellimore, former director of business development for Pure Med Spa and BriteSmile, and his wife Shannon, who left her paralegal job in April of last year to focus on GlamGlow full time, believe the brand has caught on because it kicked up mud, an ingredient consumers already knew and liked, to another level with performance skin care benefits and relied on a sole $69, 1.7-oz. stockkeeping unit that was an affordable investment for stores and shoppers alike.

“Mud is pretty funky. It may not smell very good. It comes in a jar. It isn’t sexy. So, why can’t we be the first brand in the 10,000-year history of mud to make mud sexy?” asked Glenn Dellimore. “We’ve taken high-end skin care and all the technology in high-end skin care and taken mud masks that have been around forever and fused them together.”

The success of GlamGlow’s initial product has sparked demand for more. Going forward, the brand plans to release two products a year — one for spring and one for fall — addressing different skin issues with various muds and the brand’s Teaoxi technology that delivers antioxidants, polyphenols and super squalene into the mud with pieces of leaves. In October, GlamGlow is coming out with its second product, the $69 Super-Mud Clearing Treatment, which is designed to reduce pore size, blemishes, white and blackheads and razor burn.

GlamGlow has three divisions: spas, hotels and retail. The brand is in 207 spas and six hotels worldwide. In retail, GlamGlow is on track to be sold in 1,500 to 2,000 retail doors in the U.S. by yearend. It has signed with the EC Scott Group, which works with brands that include Smashbox, Perricone MD and Bliss, to expand its reach in independent specialty stores across the country.

It is internationally where the Dellimores think that GlamGlow has the greatest potential. Sixty percent of the brand’s revenues are already from outside the U.S., but Glenn said that number could increase to as much as 95 percent as GlamGlow spans the globe. GlamGlow could be in as many as 4,000 international retail doors this year. A few of the many international retailers GlamGlow is heading to this year or next are Sephora Brazil, Sephora Canada, Douglas in Germany and Austria, and Sephora China.

GlamGlow’s sales have climbed from $40,000 in 2010, when it was founded through word-of-mouth by Hollywood studio executives and actresses, to $650,000 last year, its first year in retail, to an anticipated $2.5 million to $3 million this year before possibly hitting $10 million next year, according to Glenn Dellimore. “With that type of growth, in five years time, you are looking about a $100 million-plus brand and a major player in the skin care industry,” he said.