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Chanel filed a lawsuit against Terence Jackson, who operates TJ’s Purses and tjspurses.com, for allegedly selling counterfeit Chanel products. The case was filed on Oct. 19 in federal court in the Western District of Tennessee. According to legal documents Chanel alleged that Jackson sold earrings, watches, sunglasses, wallets, handbags, fragrances and other items bearing fake Chanel trademarks. Chanel asked the court for preliminary and permanent injunctions, damages and trial costs. Jackson could not be reached for comment.

Chanel filed a lawsuit in federal court in the Southern District of Indiana against Deji Nunayon and KMD Holdings for alleged trademark counterfeiting and infringement on Oct. 19. Nunayon and KMD Holdings operate newestbags.net, Newestbags, enticingshop.com and Enticing Shop. According to court documents Chanel asked for permanent and temporary injunctions, damages and trial costs. Defendants could not be reached for comment by press time.

On Oct. 16, Chanel filed a trademark counterfeiting and infringement lawsuit against Minran Pu, who operates under a number of names including 100ibuy.com, 100ibuy, 100ibuy Co. Ltd., USAebuy.com Inc. and USAebuy.com. The complaint was filed in federal court in Kansas. Chanel alleged the defendant sold counterfeit handbags, wallets, eyeglass frames and key chains. The luxury company asked the court for preliminary and permanent injunction, damages and trial costs. The defendant could not be reached for comment.

Estée Lauder Cosmetics and Make-Up Art Cosmetics filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against Sang Chung and Se Chung, who do business as Basic, on Oct. 16 in federal court in Nevada. According to legal documents Lauder and Make-Up Art alleged that the defendants sold products with trademarks that were confusingly similar to MAC and Viva Glam products. The complaint included claims of trademark infringement, false designation of origin, false advertising and deceptive trade practices. Lauder and Make-Up Art asked the court for preliminary and permanent injunctions, damages and trial costs. Defendants could not be reached.

Franck Muller and Yafa Antique and Yafa Jewelry reached a final consent judgment in trademark litigation in Manhattan federal court on Oct. 12. The original lawsuit was filed for alleged trademark infringement, unauthorized importation of goods, unfair competition and violations of the Tariff Act. All the charges came out of Yafa’s sales of watches Muller alleged were too similar to its own designs. The judgment forbids Yafa from infringing on Muller’s trademarks. No damages were awarded and each party agreed to pay its own legal costs.

Kirchner Corp. filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against J.C. Penney Co. Inc. and J.C. Penney Corp. on Oct. 12 in federal court in Minnesota. According to legal documents, Kirchner alleged that Penney’s sold jewelry that infringed on its “mother and child” design. Kirchner previously filed litigation against the retailer in 2003 for infringing the same design, according to the complaint. That case was settled and, according to the documents just filed, J.C. Penney acknowledged Kirchner’s trademark rights. Under the terms of the settlement, according to court documents, Penney’s agreed to paid royalty fees if it used any confusingly similar terms. Kirchner alleged that in 2006 the retailer used “mother & infant” and “mom & child” on jewelry. According to Kirchner, Penney’s elected, after being told they infringed again, not to dispute the infringement claim and to pay a royalty fee. Kirchner alleged it has been unable to collect that fee for 10 months. The lawsuit includes allegations of trademark infringement, unfair competition, trademark dilution, and deceptive trade practices. Kirchner asked the court to order J.C. Penney to comply with the settlement agreement and for an injunction, damages and trial costs. Penney’s declined to comment on pending litigation as a matter of company policy.

Matthew Potts filed a patent infringement lawsuit against VF Outdoor Inc. on Oct 11. The lawsuit was filed in San Francisco federal court. According to the complaint Potts alleged that VF Outdoor’s Reef brand “stash” model shoes infringed on a patent he holds for a shoe pocket. Potts asked the court for a preliminary and permanent injunction, damages and trial costs. VF Corp. did not return calls seeking comment.

Diane von Furstenberg Studio filed a lawsuit against Haihong Sun and David Sun, who do business as Fashion Inn, in federal court in San Francisco. According to legal documents filed Oct. 5 DVF Studio alleged trademark counterfeiting, trademark and trade name infringement, trademark dilution and related claims. DVF Studio petitioned the court for a permanent injunction, damages of at least $1 million for each counterfeited trademark and trial costs. The defendants could not be reached for comment.

Abercrombie & Fitch Co. filed a trademark infringement lawsuit in federal court in Louisville, Ky., against Winmark Corp., Marcia Cox, M&L Investment Properties, Wass International and Karen Johnson. According to legal documents filed on Oct. 4, Abercrombie alleged that the defendants sold counterfeit Abercrombie- and Hollister-branded clothes. Winmark operates 200 franchised Plato’s Closet stores. Abercrombie alleged that Wass and Johnson sold the merchandise in question to Cox and M&L in an exchange facilitated by Winmark. Abercrombie asked the court for preliminary and permanent injunctions, damages and trial costs. This is not the first litigation between the parties. Abercrombie has filed previous litigation against a Winmark franchisee. Winmark did not return calls for comment.

Anthropologie pulled a line of flatware from stores in response to claims of copyright infringement by Michael Aram Inc., according to statements from Michael Aram Inc. Michael Aram Inc. alleged that the Anthropologie “Twigware” line infringed its own “Aram Twig Flatware.” According to the company statement, its attorneys were informed that, pending additional investigation, the line was pulled from Anthropologie stores and its Web site. Anthropologie declined to comment.

Oakley filed a lawsuit against Wild Oats Markets, which operates Henrys Farmers Markets, and Zoom Eyeworks Inc. for allegedly selling sunglasses that infringe on its sunglass patents. According to documents filed in federal court in the Southern District of California on Oct. 12, Henrys sold glasses provided by Zoom. One of the Oakley designs at issue is called Splice. Oakley asked the court for preliminary and permanent injunctions, damages and trial costs in the litigation. Wild Oats and Zoom Eyeworks did not return calls seeking comment.