By  on January 7, 2011

Cartier’s newest jewel is Cartier de Lune, a new women’s scent set to hit Saks Fifth Avenue counters later this month.

The white floral musk scent, composed by the brand’s in-house perfumer, Mathilde Laurent, has top notes of pink pepper and juniper berry; a heart of white rose, cyclamen and lily of the valley, and a drydown of musk and woods.

Two sizes will be offered: a 1.5-oz. eau de toilette retailing for $75, and a 2.5-oz. version for $98. The moonstone-inspired flacon is done in shades of white and blue, with a silver metallic cap engraved with the moon, marking a departure from the brand’s signature scarlet shade.

“People aren’t expecting Cartier to play with those colors,” said Philippe Nazaret, assistant vice president of the fragrance division of Cartier North America. “Red is our signature at Cartier, and that is what people likely expect. However, you will see that we will be playing around with color with our fragrances going forward. We believe that color leads to emotion, and the blue is directly linked to the fragrance concept, which is inspired by the radiance of the moon. This will be a very strategic year for Cartier fragrances.”

In the U.S., Cartier de Lune will be exclusive to Saks this month before rolling into additional specialty store distribution and Cartier’s 36 boutiques and cartier.com in February. At full rollout, the scent will be available in about 400 doors in North America. National advertising is not planned, although visual weeks — including several planned for the Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day selling periods — will be part of the promotional process, noted Nazaret.

While Nazaret declined to comment on projected sales, industry sources estimated that Cartier de Lune could do $5 million at retail in its first year on counter in North America.

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