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BERLIN — Luxury home fragrance marketer Linari is getting into fine fragrance.

This story first appeared in the October 13, 2008 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The five-year-old German company, which produces high-end home scents in glass, wood and aluminum containers meant to double as decor items, has created four eaux de parfum called Angelo di Fiume, Notte Bianca, Eleganza Luminosa and Vista Sul Mare.

The scents were composed by Symrise perfumers Mark Buxton and Egon Oelkers. Buxton, who created some of Linari’s home scents and has also worked on Comme des Garçons and Karl Lagerfeld fragrances, lent his hand to Angelo di Fiume, which features notes of wild cherries, jasmine and vanilla, and Notte Bianca, which features anise, cashmirwood and vetiver.

Oelkers blended Eleganza Luminosa, which includes notes of bergamot, freesia and cedarwood, and Vista Sul Mare, a mix of grapefruit, spicy oils and amber.

The eaux de parfum come in 100-ml. bottles priced at 140 euros, or $189.20 at current exchange. The scents’ heavy French glass bottles resemble classic inkwells and each is topped with a flat round cap of African wenge wood, which can also serve as a stand for the bottle.

Distribution of the eau de parfum line, which is slated for specialty stores and perfumeries in Europe, Asia and the U.S., will be more limited than the home fragrance line because home stores make up a large proportion of Linari’s existing retail base, company director Rainer Diersche noted.

He estimates distribution of the eaux de parfum could reach 165 doors worldwide by next fall, a year in which the scents could generate between 1.4 million euros, or $1.9 million, and 2.1 million euros, or $2.8 million, in sales volume.

Linari’s existing diffusers, room sprays, candles and related accessories come in 14 scents and are positioned as luxury gifts. Sales amount to upward of 100,000 units annually, according to Diersche, or roughly 5.6 million euros, or $7.5 million. About 60 percent of sales are generated by the diffusers.

Linari officially unveiled its eau de parfum line at Florence’s Fragranze perfumery trade show a month ago. At that time, Linari began testing the scents at a handful of upscale German and Swiss perfumeries. The response was positive — items that were part of a presale sold out in two days and more of the fragrances are in production, according to Diersche, who contended that demand has been high.

In the U.S., Diersche is scheduled to present the line at an Oct. 26 event held by Lafco New York, which distributes the home scents, and said he envisions the eaux de parfum at Barney’s New York. He estimates U.S. distribution could reach about 40 doors in the next year. The home fragrances can be found at Takashimaya.

In Europe, where distribution of the eaux de parfum could reach 75 doors, some of Diersche’s strategic targets include Harrods, Fortnum & Mason and Bon Marché. Distribution is also planned for Russia, Australia and the Middle East.