By  on January 23, 2009

Prada is exhibiting a democratic spirit with its newest scent, Infusion de Fleur d’Oranger, due in March.

The first in a range of limited edition scents dubbed the Ephemeral Infusion Collection, Prada will put the scent on counter for four months — and then whisk it away. And to ratchet up the fashion quotient, Prada has, for the first time, borrowed an apparel print from 2003 for Infusion de Fleur d’Oranger’s outer box.

A new Ephemeral Infusion scent will be debuted each year.

But unlike the line’s original inspiration — Prada’s Exclusive Scents range, which is sold only in Prada boutiques — the Ephemeral Infusion scents will cast a wider net. In the U.S., the new scent and those that follow will be available in about 250 specialty store doors, including Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bergdorf Goodman, Prada boutiques, Bloomingdale’s and Barneys New York.

“The Exclusive Scent range is a very sophisticated product that is very selective in distribution,” noted Tomaso Galli, Prada SpA group communication and external relations director. “For the Ephemeral Infusion collection, we wanted something that was limited in time, but not in quantity. This is going to bring, we hope, an increased interest in business. In today’s world, people want new things, playful and different. We believe that providing something that is limited in time can add to the portfolio and allow more people to relate to the Prada experience.”

The Exclusive Scent range, launched in 2003, was launched with four scents — Iris, Oeillet, Cuir Ambre and Fleur d’Oranger. All were positioned as customizable, allowing the user to mix the various four juices to create a personal scent for themselves. The intent was to also disregard the traditional structure of top, middle and bottom notes, said Givaudan’s Daniela Andrier, who develops all of Prada’s juices with Miuccia Prada. “The scents were intended to interact with each other in an unusual, open-spirited manner,” said Andrier. Later, Narciso, Tubereuse, Violette, Opoponax, Benjoin and Myrhhe joined the Exclusive Scent family, the latter three in 2007. All are available in Prada boutiques only.

In addition to their wider distribution, Infusion scents are intended to evoke a light memory of the original ingredient, like “a footprint in the sand,” said Andrier, speaking specifically of Infusion de Fleur d’Oranger. “If this fragrance was a painting, I’d see it as a watercolor,” said Andrier. Infusion Fleur d’Oranger is a “descendent,” as Andrier puts it, of Prada’s Exclusive Scent No. 4, Fleur de Oranger and the house’s popular Infusion d’Iris women’s scent, borrowing notes from both.

Key notes for the new addition include orange blossoms, tuberose and jasmine.

“There’s a joyful tenderness and colorfulness to Infusion de Fleur d’Oranger — it gives the impression of an orange, rather than being overpowering and heavy, as some orange scents can be,” said Andrier. “This has a very strong presence, but it’s a beautiful diffusion.”

Jose Manuel Albesa, chief brand officer for Puig Beauty and Fashion Group, which distributes the Prada scents, calls the new introduction “a marriage of the tradition of perfumery and the modern age. It is the essence of Prada as a company — Prada always offers a mix of tradition and innovation and is always true to its DNA. That is also true of this fragrance.”

The outer box, a black floral print with green and pink aspects, was used on the runway for Prada’s fall-winter 2003 ready-to-wear collection. “It is another way for a woman to wear Prada,” said Albesa. As a bow to tradition, the bottle will also be adorned with the Prada crest designed in 1913 by Miuccia Prada’s grandfather, colored in orange as a nod to the scent’s key ingredient.

The line includes three eaux de parfum — 1.7 oz., 3.4 oz., and 6.75 oz., which will retail for $74, $100 and $135 in the U.S., respectively. Ancillaries include a Hydrating Body Lotion, $52 for 8.5 oz., and a Perfumed Bath and Shower Gel, 33.8 oz. for $50.

While the company refused to discuss projected sales, industry sources estimated the scent could do $5 million at retail in the U.S. in its four-month engagement.

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