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Sin-Care: A Beauty Ritual for the Over Indulgent

A line of nine serums promises "redemption in a bottle."

NEW YORK — Women use skin care to eradicate the signs of aging. Now, a line gaining traction in the U.S. helps women erase damage caused by more than just birthdays.

Called Sin-Care, the nine specialty serums are touted as “redemption in a bottle” for skin sins ranging from smoking and drinking alcohol to exposure to pollution or too much sun.

“Up to eighty percent of skin aging can be attributed to lifestyle choices you make,” said Kimberley Pearson, founder of Sin-Care based in Australia. Five years of research went into the serums. “The formulator of even the mostly costly creams does not know if you are a smoker, if you are going through a divorce, if you run every day or if you are a new mother not getting enough sleep,” said Pearson.

The concept came about after studies of twins demonstrated that factors such as too much sun, smoking, stress, alcohol or poor diet could add up to 11 years of difference in age appearance. Instead of a one-size fits all approach to skin care, Pearson formulated Sin-Care to address specific evils.

The serums are comprised of natural cosmeceuticals, vitamins, herbs, antioxidants and biotech ingredients like yeast and algae. They contain hyaluronic acids from a vegetal source.

 Among the serums are Party Girl for those who love cocktails, Urban Renewal to combat exposure to polluted air, Sun Goddess to offset damage from sun, Line Rewind for neglected older looking skin, Relaxation Sensation for stressed faces, Sleep Doctor aimed at women not getting enough sleep, Sugar Hit for those eating too many sweets, Smoker’s Secret and Skin Coach, a concoction perfect after workouts.

Pearson noted the serums are an add-on sale and can be used with traditional skin care lines.

Available in 50 ml. pumps retailing for $80, Sin-Care is currently sold in upscale doors, such as Fred Segal and Henri Bendel