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Last Call: Kate Hudson

The low-maintenance Hollywood mom and actress talks plastic surgery, paparazzi dodging and the secret ingredients of her beauty-enhancing green juice.

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Appeared In
Special Issue
Beauty Inc issue 11/12/2010

Actress Kate Hudson may be considered Hollywood royalty, but she’s no pampered princess. The down-to-earth mom—and newly minted Almay spokeswoman—is as low maintenance as an A-lister gets. Among her beauty secrets: getting enough sleep, taking time for herself and drinking copious amounts of her mom’s (that would be Goldie Hawn) green juice. Here, her recipe for the magic elixir and how she strategizes (not!) for the paparazzi.

How do you define beauty?

This will come out clichéd and slightly cheesy, but it starts with attitude, personality and kindness—and a little bit of hygiene. The most beautiful women are the most fun and compassionate. But then every once in a while a woman walks into a room and she is just strikingly gorgeous. The image of a mother is the most beautiful thing.

How do you nurture your mind, body and soul?

When you’re busy and have kids and a career and are in a relationship and are trying to balance everything, it’s always important to take some time out for yourself each day. My mom taught me that. No matter what it is. Painting your toenails or meditation or reading a book. Exercise is vital. We need our bodies moving and blood pumping. I go in spurts. For a month I’ll be obsessed with something, and then a month will go by without me touching a weight or going to a gym. I try to just enjoy life and do what it feels my body is telling me. Sometimes it’s to push it, and sometimes it’s to back off. I’ve always been a dancer, but I also run, spin, do yoga and Pilates.

What do you consider your best beauty asset?

I have green eyes, and it’s always nice to accentuate them. I have had more magazines Photoshop my eyes blue!

At a recent lunch with Ron Perelman [the majority shareholder of Revlon, he told WWD he meets with all spokesmodel candidates before signing them. What was your meeting with Ron like?

I have known Ron for a while, and we’ve always had a wonderful relationship. He is such a warm, hands-on, fun guy and he approached me with [the opportunity to represent] Almay. They sent me a bunch of products—and I am somewhat of a product junkie—and I just started trying everything. My makeup artist uses Almay all the time, so I knew the products. They do the best eye pencils, and I love the oil-free makeup remover. Some of the new stuff they’re doing is cool. There’s a “wake up” makeup, like a powder foundation, and it gets cool on your face and it feels really good.

As one of Hollywood’s leading young actresses, you’re under an enormous amount of scrutiny every time you walk out the door. What’s your strategy for dealing with that?

I don’t have one. I should be more calculated! I just try to live my life and not concern myself with that. I am still getting blindsided, and I don’t understand it. In my daily life I just do what I feel. I try not to pay attention to the scrutiny. It’s very negative—the media circle around celebrities and picking people apart—and I don’t want to teach my children that. I fi nd it a little bizarre, so I don’t pay much attention to it.

You’re a big proponent of natural beauty, but at the same time, Hollywood puts a lot of pressure on acresses to look forever young. Would you consider facial plastic surgery?

If it’s there, I am sure when the time comes I would want to know about it. I don’t have judgments against women who do it. I haven’t come to that point yet, so I haven’t had to think about it. It’s a different time and there are all sorts of things—laser treatments and peels—and I don’t judge a woman for it. Obviously, when they go crazy with it, it’s definitely not attractive, but I think that it’s a personal choice.

You’ve partnered with hair stylist David Babaii on a natural hair care line, and now you’ve joined Almay. Do you like being behind the scenes?

Yeah. I like it if the product has some consciousness—whether it’s affiliated with an organization or it’s naturally based. Women put so much on their face, and it’s important that [products] be as clean as possible. There are all sorts of harmful things that should be taken out of products.

What’s the best beauty tip your mom taught you?

Sleep. And her green juice. She has this thing for greens and high levels of chlorophyll. The juice is made with water and kale and spinach and omegas and fl axseed oil. I just had one of my mom’s green juices this morning. How has motherhood changed your beauty regimen? It has made it a lot harder. I don’t have as much time. I don’t remember the last time I had a facial. But there is something about being around your baby that makes you glow.

High maintenance or low?

I come somewhere in between. Nobody wants to admit it. Of course my brothers would say I am high and my friends would say low. But if you saw me right now, I’m definitely low maintenance, with chipped polish and hair not brushed. In terms of beauty regimen, I am definitely low maintenance. But in terms of work and laziness, I don’t like when people are lazy. When it comes to work, I am high maintenance. I expect everybody to show up.

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