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NPD Survey Finds TV Beauty Shoppers Spend More

Of the American women who shop for beauty products on TV, almost 25 percent of them spend more money than other shoppers.

Of the American women who shop for beauty products on TV, almost 25 percent of them spend more money than other shoppers. The same is true for 33 percent of women who shop via infomercials, according to a new report from The NPD Group.

This story first appeared in the March 20, 2009 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The report, called “Emerging Channels Series: Beauty Care Products, Special Focus: TV Shopping Networks & Infomercials,” polled females ages 18 to 64 from an NPD online panel from Nov. 20 to 26.

Overall, about 4 percent of women, or an estimated 4.9 million, shop for beauty items via TV, and they “report spending almost as much as fine department store shoppers, more than traditional department store shoppers, and those who buy from dermatologists,” NPD stated. Almost 80 percent of shoppers on the leading shopping channels, QVC and HSN, will shop-purchase if they watch.

About a third of TV shoppers are most likely to tune in between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m., NPD found, and 18 percent tune in between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Some 40 percent of infomercial shoppers usually shop between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., according to the firm.

Fifty-two percent of respondents who said they spend more money through TV shopping networks said, “It is easier to shop there,” according to NPD. The reasons the report cited included, “There are more products available that I like (43 percent),” and “I purchased more beauty products in general compared to last year (35 percent),” the firm stated.

Additionally, 38 percent of TV and infomercial shoppers said they browsed on TV to compare product pricing or get product information and then made the purchase either online or in a store, the report found.

“Most women who shop for beauty products on television say they typically do so on impulse, something that is occurring less and less at traditional channels as women make fewer shopping trips,” according to NPD.