By  on August 6, 2012

MEXICO CITY — Peru and Mexico hope to boost apparel trade 50 percent by 2014 as part of the countries’ free trade agreement, according to Igor Rojas, manager of Peruvian export promotion agency Promperu’s textiles division.

Peruvian suppliers of apparel made from pima cotton, vicuna and alpaca fabrics are keen to expand in Mexico, where they see a big market for traditional and premium Peruvian fabrics. Under the free trade accord, signed last April, Peruvian knit apparel and accessories are generally exempt from paying duties in Mexico.

Rojas’ comments came after Peruvian designer Harumi Mamota showcased her work during the Intermoda textiles fair in Guadalajara, Mexico, held July 17 to 20.

The designer makes high-end women’s wear made from alpaca, vicuna and pima fabrics for a “modern and sensual woman.”

Peruvian ambassador to Mexico Elizabeth Aztete said Peru must take advantage of a booming economy to raise exports to Mexico, Latin America’s second-biggest textiles and apparel market.

Apart from their elegance, she said Mamota’s designs stand apart because of their sustainability.

“She employs artisan producers of alpaca, pima and vicuna across Peru, giving them work they would not be able to find that easily,” Aztete told WWD during a Promperu dinner in Mexico City.

The trade agreement will also benefit Mexican apparel producers by providing a bridge through which they can access the Mercosur free-trade bloc comprising Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. This is because Peru has a free-trade agreement with Brazil.

Leading Peruvian cotton and alpaca knit manufacturers such as Ablimatex Export, Corporacion Rey and Industrias Nettalco were present in Intermoda.

The 12 enterprises hope to trade $1.8 million worth of merchandise with Mexico in the next 12 months, Rojas said.

Last year, Peru and Mexico traded $15 million worth of textiles and apparel.

To continue reading this article...

To Read the Full Article
SUBSCRIBE NOW

Tap into our Global Network

Of Industry Leaders and Designers

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus