MORE TRUCKS BANNED: The Port of Long Beach has reached another benchmark in its controversial Clean Trucks Program. As of Jan. 1, the port has banned all truck models from 1993 and older. Any truck models from 1994 to 2003 that haven’t been retrofitted to reduce emissions have also been banned. The port has achieved an almost 80 percent reduction in pollution since the program was implemented in 2008. Some 8,000 older-model trucks have been barred from operating in the port environment.

A recent air quality study conducted at the port also found a 21 percent decrease in diesel particulate matter between 2005 and 2008. Trucks emitted 20 percent less pollution in 2008 compared with 2005 and ships calling on the port saw a 26 percent reduction in diesel particulate emissions. The port credited the bulk of the reductions to efforts like the Clean Trucks Program and the Green Flag program that reduced the speed of vessels as they approached and operated in the port. There was, however, a 3 percent decline in the amount of cargo shipped through the port.



CARGO VOLUMES REACH BOTTOM:
Cargo volumes at the nation’s major retail ports are forecast to rise for three consecutive months beginning in February, according to the National Retail Federation’s monthly Port Tracker.

The nation’s ports handled 1.2 million 20-foot equivalent units, or TEU, in October, which is a peak month as retailers bring in goods for the holiday season. Cargo levels in October, which is the most recent month for which figures are available, represented a 14 percent decline from cargo volumes reported in October 2008 and the 28th month of year-over-year declines. November, December and January cargo volumes were expected to be down 12 percent, 1 percent and 4 percent, respectively. This would mark 31 months of year-over-year declines, a streak that is expected to be broken with a forecast of a 16 percent increase in volume for February.

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus