It was clear from the setting that Playboy is trying to strike a new chord with advertisers.

The men’s magazine, which declared last fall that it would stop depicting naked women on its covers, held what Donald Trump would refer to as a “very classy” Digital NewFronts presentation on Friday at Skylight Modern in New York. Potential advertisers and journalists were treated to citrus cocktails with sprigs of rosemary and artisanal pretzels, miniature quiches, steak frites hors-d’oeuvres, kale and beet chips and various Mexican and Asian-inspired bites, among other things, before the presentation of its slate of videos began. The Playboy logo was prominently displayed in the low-lit room through light projection, as was the tagline: “We’re all ears,” as guests mingled and listened to music DJ’d by Chelsea Leyland.

Playboy Enterprises chief executive officer Scott Flanders opened the presentation with remarks on the “new” Playboy, while teasing out that following the 30-minute presentation, the company’s Playmates would come out to greet guests. After all, they are “our best brand ambassadors,” he noted.

The insinuation had the crowd thinking that Playboy may nod to its lascivious heritage with the arrival of semi-clad bunnies. Their appearance would surely rival, if not best, the entourage of Magic Mike Live strippers trotted out by Hearst during its NewFronts presentation last week. But the scantily clad days are gone at Playboy. Playmates merely donned satin baseball-style jackets with the word “Playmates” sewn on the back.

To kick things off, Playboy showed a reel depicting its 63-year history as the original “bad boy” brand, going back to when Hugh Hefner founded the men’s glossy. Videos of women, cars, parties, Hefner as a young man, celebrities attesting to the brand’s power and images of in-book interviews with entertainers, politicians and business leaders flashed during the presentation.

Waris Ahluwalia, the actor and House of Waris designer, came to the stage and introduced himself as the event’s host. He was there to provide detail on his new show for Playboy, which shared the same name as his accessories brand. Ahluwalia’s show takes the form of a dinner party with some of his buzzy friends, as they tackle questions about love, identity, relationships, career and what it means to be a man today. The first episode features “Orange is the New Black” star Natasha Lyonne, Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth, comedian Horatio Sanz and filmmaker Liz Goldwyn.

Other shows include “Meccas,” a travel-inspired program that takes viewers to destinations that have influenced culture. The pilot episode was shot in Cuba and explores the country’s “rum haunts.” Another show, which surely takes inspiration from Vice, is dubbed “Journalista.” Hosted by 25-year-old correspondent Yoonj Kim, the documentary-style series explores the worlds of sex, drugs and alternative lifestyles. For instance, Kim reports on cannabis and cancer treatment, a topic Vice (and others) have explored in recent years.

Playboy also highlighted its epicurean show “What the Food?” hosted by molecular gastronomist Wylie Dufresne and molecular mixologist Dave Arnold. The company said it would launch a political podcast on the “circus of the election.” While similar in spirit to Bloomberg’s “The Circus,” Playboy said its version will cover issues central to the presidential campaign, and not necessarily the inner workings of it.

The magazine company will launch native content unit Playboy Studios, as well as a data-centric index called “The Play,” which gives insight to sex and relationships and what Millennials want when it comes to those topics. The company also unveiled a host of scripted comedies and shows on gaming and tech.

“We made Playboy.com safe for work,” said chief digital officer Phillip Morelock. “In today’s world of marketing fatigue…Playboy breaks through.”

Morelock and his coworker Cory Jones, chief content officer, noted that since its relaunch in the last year, Playboy has brought the age of its average audience down to 31 years old from 47. They also touted Playboy’s reach on Facebook, stretching to 75 million consumers with video views of 28 million, making Playboy the “biggest men’s brand in social media.”

“Playboy is the brand that breaks through for male Millennials,” said Jones, who offered that in the “fragmented media market, authenticity really matters.”

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