By  on October 11, 2007

Bergdorf Goodman wants to show off its ever-changing and reorganized decorative home business and will distribute its first catalogue devoted entirely to the category.

The 16-page book, which gets mailed next week to 100,000 customers, is filled with distinct vintage objects and exclusives from around the world, including European hotel silver, Venetian glassware, custom linens with hand-appliquéd poplin borders and painted porcelains.

There are also several rare items such as a Pampaloni sterling silver snake-handled serving fork and spoon set for $1,500, a $3,000 fox throw from Adrienne Landau and a 24-karat gold "image" case with red glass-fired enamel for $9,000. It was created by photographer Monica Rich Kosann to hold a couple of photos as an alternative to a standard frame.

Still, the range is wide, from small dishes priced at $75 to $4,000 sculptural pewter pieces, mirroring the scope of Bergdorf's eclectic home department on the seventh level of the women's store.

The cover of the catalogue features two opulent spiked metal orbs by Kelly Wearstler, priced from $1,400 to $2,400. It's a nod to Wearstler's first home boutique, which will open on Bergdorf's seventh floor Oct. 19. But she's not new to the store. Wearstler designed the BG restaurant, also on seven, in the style of glamorous Twenties salons.

"In the past three years we have made a lot of changes on the home floor, so we wanted a book that echoed the spirit by showing the diversity of the merchandise," said Nicholas Manville, divisional vice president of decorative home. "Most of the changes started when we opened the restaurant, BG, three years ago. Then we began to rethink the rest of the space and ways to make it as productive as possible. We made a lot of moves and consolidated certain themes together, and focused on making the hallways more exhibit-driven." He added that the 9,500-square-foot floor has grown 30 percent in sales over the last three years.

In the past, Bergdorf would include home in its apparel or gift catalogues with a focus on single home-related items. "This time, we are revealing the full lifestyle — full rooms of merchandise as opposed to a single shot with a single item," Manville explained.

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