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LONDON — Over the past year, Natasha Law’s mother, Maggie, has happily started a whole new series of scrapbooks. After years of clipping and saving stories on her actor son, Jude, she’s now doing the same for her daughter, the painter.

“She’s already on the 10th volume for Jude — she tears everything out of the press. But I’m catching up slowly. Mine’s about three pages long,” says Law over a bottle of water at the Covent Garden Hotel.

This story first appeared in the October 6, 2003 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

Law, who is taking part in “Kaleidoscope,” a group show that opens Wednesday at Ingrao in New York, started out as a fashion illustrator. After graduating from Camberwell College of Arts in London, she worked with small fashion labels in London’s East End, designing apparel prints.

Her first big break came when her sister-in-law, Sadie Frost, recruited her to work on the first FrostFrench show at St. Martin’s Lane Hotel two years ago. Law designed the girly hotel room where Frost and Jemima French showed their lingerie and ready-to-wear collection. She also later designed invitations and fabric for the duo.

The following year, Law, 32, held her first solo show at London’s Space gallery, an incubator for up-and-coming talent run by Laura Parker Bowles.

The show — which sold out — featured paintings of girls undressing. “I loved playing with the whole idea of how you can make someone the object of a gaze, and also give them a sense of privacy and detachment.”

Law paints with household gloss, the sort of shiny paint most people use on windowsills. “I like stark distinctions, and the gloss does that. A painting’s depth comes from the lacquer. By the fourth or fifth layer, the paintings have a reflective surface and a juicy, deep quality about them.”

Law also loves the human form and especially when she can zoom in on its different elements. In “Kaleidoscope,” her nude paintings of women are cut off just above the lips or below the knees.

“By not including the eyes or the face, you can give so much more importance to a shoulder, a nipple or a hand,” says Law. “By showing the body in chunks, the effect is more mysterious — and more empowering.”

Law said her younger brother’s success has been a boon to her career — in a variety of ways.

“Jude gave me the initial exposure and the platform for my work because of who his friends were. I tried to avoid that for so long because the two of us are so adamant about doing things on our own steam.”

Jude’s success also worked wonders when it came time for Natasha to convince her parents, who hoped she would become an academic, that she could make it in the art world. Indeed, Law graduated with a degree in history from the University of Warwick in Coventry, England. But the fit wasn’t right, which is why she eventually went to Camberwell, graduating in 2000 with a degree in graphic design.

“When everything went well with Jude, I think my parents felt vindicated. They didn’t feel so much anxiety about us, and they just started to relax.”

Now, Law says, “My dream is to just carry on working. And to be bought.”

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