At Lighthouse International’s Posh Affair dinner on Monday at the Plaza Hotel, Hamish Bowles took a moment to consider his glasses.

 

“I’ve probably been wearing them about 20 years; an early adulthood thing yes, they might have been a faint affectation before,” Bowles said of his silver-accented tortoise shell frames. “But now they’re needed.”

 

The dinner marked the kickoff of the charity’s annual Posh Sale, the proceeds of which benefit its efforts to help people stricken with vision loss or blindness. Given the cause at hand, it seemed fair game to ask attendees, who included Stacey Bendet, Carolina Herrera and a host of socials such as Lizzie Tisch, Muffie Potter Aston and Adelina Wong Ettelson, what their own visual impairments might be.

 

“I live my life with my eyes,” said Linda Fargo, who a week previous had sported a fairly involved black veil to the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Gala. “You know it’s funny that veil was annoying me because it blocked my vision. I don’t even like to wear sunglasses for that reason.” Though she went spec-less on Monday, Fargo admitted to needing glasses. “Even for my speech tonight, I had my assistant print it out in about three different fonts,” she said.

 

Later in the evening, Fargo, who was honored for her work with the charity, proved she wasn’t entirely dependent on her very-well-prepared remarks, when she went off script momentarily to note that she would not be thanking her family tree. The remark was a gentle rib of her fellow honoree, Kim Baker Campbell, who earlier had lost the audience for a stretch when she mentioned seemingly every one of her many relatives in attendance. Amy Fine Collins rounded out the triumvirate of honorees.

 

For her part, Fargo had the fortune to be introduced by Iris Apfel, owner of easily the most recognizable frames in the room.

 

“Well I just thought if I had to wear glasses, I might as well wear glasses,” Apfel had said of her colossal black bifocals during cocktail hour. “When people ask me why they’re this size, I always say, ‘The bigger to see you.’”

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus