By  on December 18, 2009

SoulCycle is known to have people lining up for its spinning classes, but there’s no waiting list for the company’s new activewear line designed by Stephanie Hirsch.

With clubs in Bridgehampton, N.Y., and the Upper East and Upper West Sides of Manhattan, company founders Elizabeth Cutler and Julie Rice seem to already have a captive audience. Devotees of SoulCycle’s 45-minute full-body, indoor cycling workouts include Chelsea Clinton, Tory Burch, Kelly Ripa, Brooke Shields and Kyra Sedgwick. Next month, the three-and-a-half-year-old brand will broaden its reach with a TriBeCa location at 101 Warren Street and another in Scarsdale at 7 Popham Road. SoulCycle’s performance-oriented activewear will be available in stores early next month and on its Web site, soul-cycle.com, starting Jan. 11.

While showing off the debut seven-piece collection at the Third Avenue club Thursday, Hirsch said she got hooked on the spinning classes after having her second child last year. She also last year sold her stake in the Inca swimwear label she started.

In synch with the empowerment-minded classes, SoulCycle’s inaugural activewear line is called the Spiritual Warrior collection. (Working out to inspiring music amidst scented candles, cyclists are encouraged by instructors to connect with their spiritual core.) “I was so inspired. It changed my life. I found myself doing it because I wanted to, not because I had to,” Hirsch said. “When they asked me to do the clothes, I wanted to show that fitness [wear] can be fashionable. It’s called Spiritual Warrior for a reason. This is a tough, sexy look.”

Made of moisture-wicking Vaportex, the activewear retails from $35 for a camouflage trimmed sports bra to $150 for a sleeveless, full-length unitard. The label is not being wholesaled at this time, but it may be down the road. SoulCycle’s founders haven’t determined projected sales for the clothing.

The apparel industry is new territory for Cutler and Rice, who became exercise physiologists before starting their company, but hailed from different fields — real estate and entertainment, respectively.

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