Backstage at Carven RTW Spring 2017


PARIS — Fashion’s revolving door continues to spin furiously, with Carven’s duo the latest to depart after a brief tenure.

Alexis Martial and Adrien Caillaudaud, named artistic directors for Carven’s women’s collections in March 2015, are departing “by mutual agreement,” the house confirmed in a brief statement.

It noted a new artistic director would be appointed at a later date.

Martial and Caillaudaud’s last collection was for spring, presented in Paris last Sept. 29 at Paris Fashion Week.

It delved into the heritage of the house and its late founder, Marie-Louise Carven, employing such house codes as the Carven crest, the green and white stripes from the Ma Griffe perfume packaging, scarves and Carven’s obsession with flowers.

The pair, who met at the Atelier Chardon Savard fashion school in Paris and both went on to work at Givenchy, had succeeded Guillaume Henry, who exited to join Nina Ricci.

Martial began his career at Givenchy in 2007, working as a knitwear designer on the ready-to-wear and couture lines.

After getting his start designing shoes at Marc Jacobs, Caillaudaud joined Givenchy in 2009 and was responsible for the design of accessories, including jewelry, leather goods, men’s and women’s shoes. More recently, he has consulted for Tod’s and Jil Sander.

Fashion is enduring a period of many designer exits, with Marni founder Consuelo Castiglioni bidding farewell and Roberto Cavalli parting ways with designer Peter Dundas.

In July, Carven parted ways with its men’s wear designer Barnabé Hardy, an alum of Balenciaga, after 18 months.

The contemporary label, owned since May by Bluebell Group, decided to put the men’s line on hold and focus on the women’s collection.

Bluebell is a Hong Kong-based, family-owned company that distributes fashion, fragrance, food and home brands throughout Asia.

The house of Carven was founded in 1945 by the late Madame Carven, the French couturier who traveled the world with her collections and brought back a trove of exotic influences.

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