By  on April 26, 2010

With an eye on craftsmanship of the past as well as on the future, fine jeweler Lucifer Vir Honestus is expanding into handbags, belts and e-commerce.

The Italian house, which is named after a 14th-century Milan goldsmith, is growing beyond its rarefied, one-of-a-kind fine jewelry pieces that are favored by fashion’s in-crowd, including Sarah Jessica Parker.

The 12-year-old brand, founded by the wife-husband team of Luna Scamuzzi and Paolo Mandelli, will inaugurate lucifer-vir-honestus.com, next month.

Scamuzzi’s unique amorphous designs are known for their incorporation of rare and unusual gemstones in irregular cuts, such as rubellite, tourmaline and amber set into baroque rose gold settings with granulation and diamond accents.

The line is sold at Barneys New York, Ylang 23 in Dallas, Marissa Collection in Naples, Fla., and at other exclusive specialty stores internationally, including boutiques in Russia, China, Italy and Japan.

“I use many different kinds of stones that have to be beautiful for color, shape, brightness and size,” said Scamuzzi, who works alongside Mandelli, a former financier and the brand’s business manager.

Accessories were a natural extension for Scamuzzi, who in 2006 started to create belt buckles for a Japanese customer. Such organic-looking belt buckles, created in sterling silver, became the basis for the bags, which range from crocodile clutches, finished with a decorative metal fob to a tote with hardware in shades of nude, black, gold and olive green.

Prices for belts begin at $1,000 and bags range from $6,000 to $9,000. Fine jewelry retails from $1,000 to $80,000. Rings, for which the house is most well known, average $4,000 to $8,000.

Scamuzzi said the expansion was more organic than strategic.

“We want to make jewelry in the best way that we can and the best quality that we can,” she said. “We think that in this moment a lot of people try to make everything and it can hurt the quality of products. A good job needs to be concentrated in just one thing. The future will be in the high quality of goods and not in the quantity.”

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