Vittorio Missoni’s Body Remains Missing

A year after the small aircraft disappeared into the Venezuelan waters, the body of the fashion executive has still not been identified.

MILAN — A year after the small aircraft YV2615 BN-2A Islander that carried Vittorio Missoni, his life partner Maurizia Castiglioni and their friends Elda Scalvenzi and Guido Foresti disappeared into the Venezuelan waters off the Los Roques archipelago, the body of the fashion executive has still not been identified.

This story first appeared in the January 6, 2014 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The Missoni house on Friday issued a statement saying that “the laboratory analysis on the biological findings recovered during the early submarine searches that took place the week of Oct. 15 and during the recovery of part of the cabin on Nov. 25 off Los Roques was brought solely for the identification of Maurizia Castiglioni and of the two Venezuelan pilots Hernan Jose Marchan and Juan Carlos Ferrer Milano.” The statement continued, underscoring that “until today, no biological findings have been recovered” that would allow for the identification of the bodies of Missoni, Foresti or Scalvenzi.

The company said that “the investigations to determine the causes and the dynamics of the accident and the identity of all passengers are still under way.” The families of the missing parties took the opportunity to thank the Venezuelan and Italian governments for their work and to express their “hope that the submarine search on the remaining parts” of the plane will “shortly” determine the recovery and identification of Missoni, Foresti and Scalvenzi.

At the end of June, the oceanographic ship Deep Sea found the airplane that had disappeared on Jan. 4 last year.

The plane was identified on the fifth day of the search thanks to the American ship’s technology, located in the waters north of the Los Roques archipelago off of Venezuela.

At the time, according to Italy’s newswire Ansa, a source close to the Farnesina, Italy’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, said the plane was in pieces at about 230 feet below sea level, and had been identified through its serial number.

According to Néstor Reverol, Venezuela’s minister for justice and home affairs, Missoni’s twin-engine Britten-Norman BN-2 Islander plane took off from Los Roques on Jan. 4 headed to the Simón Bolívar International Airport in Maiquetía, about 13 miles from downtown Caracas, and sent out its last signals about 10 nautical miles from Los Roques before disappearing.

Missoni and Castiglioni were vacationing in Venezuela with four Italian friends, including Foresti and Scalvenzi. Scalvenzi’s brother, Giuseppe, and his wife, Rosa Apostoli, didn’t take the same flight directed to Caracas because there was not enough room on the plane.