WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/anastase-in-production-deal-1732715/
government-trade
government-trade

Anastase in Production Deal

Designer signs with Italy's Pier One.

LONDON — Paris-born, London-based designer Charles Anastase has signed a five-year manufacturing and licensing agreement with Pier SpA, the Italian high-end clothing manufacturer owned by Diesel’s Renzo Rosso.

This story first appeared in the September 2, 2008 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The deal means Anastase will be able to expand on the categories he offers as part of his four-year-old line. His pre-spring collection — the first he’s produced with Pier SpA — includes new materials such as knitwear, gauzy georgette dresses and cotton T-shirts as part of his nautical-inspired lineup.

“What was very attractive for me [about Anastase’s collection] was that it’s so delicate and somehow romantic, but at the same time very modern and metropolitan,” said Marzia Narduzzi, comanaging director of the Veneto-based Pier SpA, which also has licensing and manufacturing agreements with design houses including Balenciaga, Chloé, Azzedine Alaïa and Dior Homme. “We want [the collection] to stay a niche product, but to give the collection different directions that he couldn’t do alone.”

Anastase said while his collection’s style will remain unchanged, the deal will “help to settle down the business.” Previously, Anastase produced his entire collection from his London atelier. While price points for the collection, which run up to about 800 pounds, or $1,450, for a silk coat, will remain unchanged, Pier will help Anastase add more accessible pieces. Narduzzi said the label has acquired 10 new stockists for pre-spring, including Lik Boutique Moscow in Moscow and Ships and Edition in Tokyo. Anastase said he also plans to gradually add accessories and men’s wear.

Next month will mark another change for the designer, who will show his spring collection in London rather than Paris, at One Marylebone Road, a deconsecrated church near Baker Street. Despite showing in a new city, Anastase said the collection will stay faithful to his recurring themes of doll-like dresses inspired by images of 19th-century childhood. He said a men’s line will also take cues from childlike proportions.

Narduzzi added that while the agreement with Anastase is initially a manufacturing and licensing deal, in the future the company would consider partnering with the brand. “My impression is very positive, we want to invest in this brand,” said Narduzzi.