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Article February 20, 1996

<CR><RD><BR><CS:BOLD>FINDINGS<BR><BR></CS>DIAMONDS DAILY: To emphasize the point that diamond jewelry is no longer just for special occasions, this year the Diamond Information Center (DIC) has renamed its annual Diamonds Today design competition,...


FINDINGS

DIAMONDS DAILY: To emphasize the point that diamond jewelry is no longer just for special occasions, this year the Diamond Information Center (DIC) has renamed its annual Diamonds Today design competition, “Diamonds Today — For Every Day.”
The DIC, the U.S. publicity arm of De Beers’ diamonds, is seeking pieces that will be salable, timeless and wearable with everything from ballgowns to blue jeans.
Unlike past years’ competitions, when entrants could use multiple diamonds in the items they submitted, this year only one solitaire diamond of 1/2 carat or more may be used in the design of each piece. According to a DIC spokeswoman: “The idea is to show that a diamond is an essential element of style, a classic item for day-to-day life.”
To give the jewelry a wide range of appeal, the DIC has stipulated that all entries must carry a retail value between $2,000 and $20,000. Each candidate may submit up to three pieces in any combination of bracelets, necklaces/pendants, earrings, pins and fashion rings, although only one fashion ring entry will be allowed per contestant. Bridal rings are not eligible for entry.
The winning items will be featured in both national advertising campaigns and booklets that will be available to consumers and retailers. Designers and firms that enter the contest must be capable of reproducing their entries for distribution to fine jewelry retailers.
The contest will be judged by a panel of six and will include members of the fashion, media and retail communities. The judging will take place on March 20, and the deadline for entries is March 13.

BAKER MOVES ON: Neal Baker has joined New York-based multiple classification firm I. Shalom Inc. as sales coordinator of the firm’s licensed Totes cold-weather accessories line, a new post.
Baker had been president of Jack Baker Fifth Avenue, a New York millinery firm that closed at the beginning of January.
I. Shalom entered into the licensing agreement with Totes in March 1995 and is currently expanding the line.

JOINING FORCES: Fashion jewelers Jay Feinberg and Gregg Weingeroff have decided to pool their resources. Feinberg is president and designer of New York firm Jay Strongwater, and Weingeroff is president of the Cranston, R.I.-based Weingeroff Enterprises manufacturing firm, which produces its own line, as well as the licensed line of Oscar de la Renta jewelry.
Feinberg also designs the Oscar de la Renta line for Weingeroff. Starting with the May accessories market, both companies’ collections will be shown at Strongwater’s showroom at 11 East 36th St. Weingeroff will close its New York showroom at 385 Fifth Ave.; it had used this space to sell the Oscar de la Renta line.
In the meantime, Weingeroff will take over production, distribution and administrative operations for Jay Strongwater and will handle them out of its corporate facilities in Rhode Island. Weingeroff maintains regional sales staffs throughout the U.S., who will add the Strongwater line to their repertoire for fall.