LOW RESPONSE TO CAROLE LITTLE REWARD OFFER

Byline: Louise Farr

LOS ANGELES--Detectives here are still puzzled over the limited response to their announcement last Thursday of a $100,000 reward for information leading to a conviction in the murders of Carole Little Co. corporate controller Rolando Ramirez and Kenneth Martin, vice president of worldwide sourcing.
Ramirez was shot to death in his car on May 4 shortly after leaving Carole Little's headquarters here. Martin was shot in Culver City last December after he appeared to be evading a pursuer driving a compact Japanese pickup truck.
By Tuesday only three calls--none of them helpful--had come in to the Los Angeles Police Department's robbery-homicide division in response to the reward, offered by the Carole Little company.
"I would love to report that we have a suspect in custody, but we're no further ahead," detective Fred Miller said in an interview Tuesday, during which he discounted earlier press reports that police and the Carole Little company are conducting an internal audit to ferret out possible embezzlement.
"They do an internal audit every year," Miller said about Carole Little. "They figured they may as well move it up earlier this year."
So far, police have refused to comment on whether ballistics tests indicate a link between the Ramirez and Martin murders. Different guns were used in a September 1993 freeway shooting attack on Karin Wong Holzinger, former Carole Little vice president of domestic manufacturing, and the murder two months later of Glendale sewing contractor Jack Antonyan, who did business with the Carole Little company.
In interviews last week, Holzinger, who said she also survived two 1993 bomb attacks on her house, expressed the belief that the violence is related to reprisals over the Carole Little company's move to cut back on its contractors. In August 1993, Holzinger said, immediately after letters went out informing contractors of the company's cutbacks, she spotted a male prowler outside her house. Two weeks after that, the violence began.
"My personal view?" said Pamela Anderson, lawyer for Holzinger, who is suing the Carole Little company for terminating her employment in December 1993. "Someone's trying to make an example out of Carole Little."
In a statement Monday, the Carole Little firm expressed sadness over the deaths of Martin and Ramirez and its belief that "there is no evidence linking these two murders other than the fact that they were both executives [of Carole Little]."
The firm added that it would grant no further interviews "in respect to the families and diligent effort of...law enforcement agencies."

To Read the Full Article
SUBSCRIBE NOW

Tap into our Global Network

Of Industry Leaders and Designers

load comments
blog comments powered by Disqus