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Article November 8, 1994

<CR><RD><BR><CS:BOLD>YARNS '95: NEW TEXTURES<BR><BR>Byline: </CS>Margaret Mazzaraco<BR><BR>NEW YORK -- Boucles, seed and flake yarns, and brushed mohair will be among the top surface attractions for fall 1995 sweater dressing.<BR>The yarns will take...


YARNS ’95: NEW TEXTURES

Byline: Margaret Mazzaraco

NEW YORK — Boucles, seed and flake yarns, and brushed mohair will be among the top surface attractions for fall 1995 sweater dressing.
The yarns will take on new treatments, sometimes giving them more loft, plush, and creating a heightened tweedy feel.
That’s the word from fashion consultant Ron Rubin, who gave his forecast at a seminar during the recent International Trimmings Expo held at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers. His presentation — entitled, “Windows of the World” — used photos of retail window displays in Paris, Milan, London and New York and was augmented by samples of new ideas from U.S. knitwear makers. The session drew about 125 apparel manufacturers, designers, knitters and knit stylists, fiber and yarn executives.
The new yarn treatments will be showing up in a broad range of design ideas, from subtle ombres to bold graphics, Rubin said. He noted stripes will be particularly important, and Fair Isle head-to-toe dressing will be a key look. He showed Fair Isle designs in a full range of natural tones, including mixtures of camel and taupe.
Midweight bouclés were shown in cardigans, very long dresses and short crop boxy tops, in ensembles mixing stripes, solids and tweeds for total knit dressing. Colors included taupe, gray and slate blue mid-tones.
Another trend cited by Rubin consisted of pastel mohair-blend under-constructed and gossamer-like knits.
“These items have a lot of openwork, telling us about the soft feminine ways sweaters can go…these lightweight pieces are great for layering.”
Silhouettes included a short crop sweater, a turtleneck short skimp dress and a sleeveless vest in natural shades and pale tones of pink, melon and lemon.
Along with mohair blends, wool with nylon, wool with acrylic and 100 percent wool were featured.
Following the presentation, knitwear from eight manufacturers was displayed, illustrating how several of the concepts in Rubin’s presentation could be translated into U.S.-made knits. Participating companies in the display were Knitmaker, division of Beldoch Industries, New York; Gloray/Sierra Co., Reading, Pa.; Kellwood Co.’s New York-based apparel marketing division; Hampshire Designers, San Francisco; Gotthelf Knitting, Boonton, N.J.; Winona Knitting, Winona, Minn.; Blue Morgan/SWAK, New York, and Beverly Hills Knitting, Los Angeles.