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NEW YORK — Calvin Klein ads have been called a lot of things over the years, but patriotic has never really come to mind. Until now.

For his spring Collection and CK Jeans campaigns, which break in March magazines, Klein unveils a new red and blue logo that looks like it’s hand-drawn.

“It’s not intentionally patriotic,” said Kim Vernon, senior vice president, CRK Advertising, Klein’s in-house agency. “It’s red and blue, but it works with the black-and-white photographs.”

The reinterpreted logo has the name Calvin in blue and Klein in red, with the letters filled in with pinstripes, almost as if a child drew it with a tricolored ballpoint pen. Some of the jeans ads carry white swirls and black designs around the images.

“The overriding feeling of the campaign is more fun,” explained Vernon. “It was important to have a creative change. It’s a departure from what the company has done before.”

But of course, it wouldn’t be a Calvin Klein campaign without a bit of sex and nudity. In one CK Calvin Klein Belts ad, for example, a topless Jessica Miller is lying on her side, wearing only jeans and a rope belt. In another, her hair is wet, her legs are spread and she’s wearing short-shorts and a bra top. She appears opposite another photo of herself in black pants and waistcoat, and a white top.

In a CK Jeans double-page spread, there are images of Miller wearing jeans and suspenders, but no top, and she’s pulling her foot back, and in another, she’s shown crouching in short-shorts and a top, with her hands over her head. That image is surrounded by white swirly lines and black designs.

The ads feature Miller exclusively, the first time Klein has used only one female model since Kate Moss. The male models are Travis (who’s also under contract as the the Calvin Klein Underwear model), and Lawrence Chapman and Carl Brolin, who are both new to Klein.

“One of the reasons we’re so happy with her [Miller] as a model for us is she’s incredibly versatile,” said Vernon.

The ads were art-directed by CRK Advertising, along with M/M, a small creative agency in Paris. They were shot by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin. It’s the first time Klein has used the duo for its ad campaigns.

The Collection and CK Jeans ads will run as lifestyle portfolios of four to 14 pages in a variety of magazines. Some 22 units will run in magazines in the U.S., Europe and Asia, accounting for a total of 700 pages. “We don’t have a lot of tricks. The portfolios are really the news,” said Vernon, noting the spring ad budget is flat. She said the company didn’t want to spread itself too thin and believes that the portfolios will have more impact than more frequent ads in additional magazines.

Ads will run in the U.S., French, Italian, British and Japanese editions of Vogue, Vanity Fair, Elle, Details, Interview, W, Harper’s Bazaar, the New York Times Magazine, Marie Claire, Jane, In Style, Esquire, FHM, Maxim, Nylon, Paper, Rolling Stone, Vibe and Spin and the U.S., Italian and British editions of GQ. Ads will also run outdoors in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, London, Milan, Paris, Madrid, Barcelona, Hamburg, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Vernon declined to reveal the spring budget, but said it’s flat with a year ago. According to Competitive Media Reporting, Calvin Klein spent about $9 million on its women’s and men’s Collection, CK Jeans and accessories advertising in the first half of 2001.