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PARIS — Parfums Christian Dior is coming out with the skin care line Capture R60/80 as the first step in bolstering its treatment segment.

This story first appeared in the November 8, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

Starting worldwide in January 2003, the LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton-owned firm will replace its 16-year-old Capture antiwrinkle line with nine units of Capture R60/80. The idea is to raise Dior’s skin care profile and grow its sales in treatment, according to company executives.

These executives would not comment on sales projections, but industry sources estimate the Capture R60/80 line could ring up $15 million to $20 million in wholesale volume in its first year.

“For us, it’s a key launch,” said Claude Martinez, president and chief executive officer of Parfums Christian Dior. “We hope to make Capture R60/80 a strong brand. It has the potential to become the strongest [line in our portfolio]. Antiaging is a global concern for all women; it’s the fastest-developing segment.”

On the one hand, the name Capture R60/80 is meant to capitalize on the Capture brand name. “Capture has strong impact — it’s a strong name in the consumer’s mind,” explained Sabina Belli, international marketing director for fragrance products at Parfums Christian Dior and director of license development for fragrances and cosmetics at LVMH.

R60/80 refers to antiaging and the technology behind the new line. The R stands for “rides” (or wrinkles in English) and R-Complex, which includes extracts of mallow flower, potentilla and lipopeptide, and purportedly smooths wrinkles and firms skin. The 60 refers to Dior’s claim that the products reduce wrinkles by up to 60 percent after one hour and the 80 stands for the 80 percent more youthful complexion purportedly attained after one month of its use. A polymer mix, called BiSkin, ensures the distribution of the active ingredients and helps to keep the skin taut.

“We wanted to re-create the same excitement with a new complex that Capture did with liposomes,” continued Belli, referring to the antiaging ingredient that, in the Eighties, Dior claimed to have been the first to have introduced in a beauty product. She added that R-Complex is an even bigger scientific finding.

An advertising campaign for Capture R60/80 with single- and double-page spreads will break at launch. Samples, including 2.5-ml. sachets, will also be distributed.

The line includes Extra-Vital Restoring Serum in 30- and 50-ml. pumps that will sell for $57.80 and $86.70, respectively; Ultimate Wrinkle Creme in two textures in 30- and 50-ml. jars for $43.90 and $65.25, respectively; Wrinkle Eye Creme in a 15-ml. jar for $42.30; Intense Wrinkle Night Fluid in a 30-ml. pump for $53.80, and Instant Ultra-Smoothing Fluid in a 15-ml. pump for $42.30.

All dollar prices have been converted from the euro at current exchange rates and are for France.

The launch of Capture R60/80 will coincide with the debut of DiorScience, the newly reorganized Laboratoires Christian Dior, which is meant to place in the limelight Dior’s skin care know-how. Going forward, its logo will appear on Dior treatment ads.

DiorScience comprises departments including one for analysis and consumer testing; one for research and development, and a training center.

Dior is also in the process of rearranging its skin care portfolio into seven categories, in which each has a specific focus, to make its offer clearer for customers. The Capture collection, for instance, will focus on wrinkles and include the new line.