WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/cindy-crawford-newest-face-of-nice-8217-n-easy-733859/

NEW YORK — One of beauty’s most famous supermodels is back.

This story first appeared in the April 18, 2003 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

Cindy Crawford, the megamodel whose name is practically synonymous with beauty, has signed a deal with Procter & Gamble to serve as the face and voice for Clairol’s Nice ’n Easy hair color brand. The first ad to feature Crawford is scheduled to broadcast April 21.

Details of the deal were not disclosed but Clairol executives said the contract allows for appearances in print, online, in-store and direct marketing advertising campaigns, too. Industry sources estimate Crawford’s contract could be worth more than $1 million per year.

Melissa Lush, Nice ’n Easy’s senior brand manager, said Crawford was the brand’s most obvious choice since at this stage in her life, Crawford best represents Nice ’n Easy’s core consumer.

“We were looking for a personality that has the right fit with the brand. We are looking at Cindy as more than a model, she has a persona that fits in with the upbeat, personal, busy mom that she is. Her lifestyle is consistent with the Nice ’n Easy brand,” Lush said.

For the ads, Crawford’s brown hair has been treated with Nice ’n Easy’s Light Golden Brown 116A. In a phone interview, Crawford said the shade is lighter than her natural hair color, but that now it matches the color of her one-and-a-half year old daughter, who appears in at least one version of the ads. Both 15- and 30-second commercial versions have been filmed; print ads break in the third quarter. For the TV shoot, Serge Normant styled Crawford’s hair and Dick Page applied the makeup.

Nice ’n Easy’s most recent spokespersons were actresses. Debra Messing, the lead actress from the hit TV show “Will & Grace,” served as the brand’s face in 2000. In 1993, Seinfeld actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus was the brand’s spokesperson.

Crawford, who once served as a spokesperson for Revlon and Pepsi, continues to serve as a spokesperson for Omega watches, EAS Health and Sports products and 24-Hour Fitness. She has also partnered with Ellen Tracy and Foster Grant.

In February, Clairol unleashed its largest color initiative in its 71-year history with a new technology designed to deliver richer, deeper color, which debuted in Nice ’n Easy color kits, called copper blocking. The technology aims to block the element copper, commonly found in hair via tap water, from reacting with dye molecules in hair color formulas. The objective is to prevent the copper from prematurely speeding up the coloring process, which can waste much of the product, leaving hair with a dyed color that is not as rich, vibrant or true in tone as it should be. Much of the formula, consequently, ends up being washed away.

Nice ’n Easy launched in 1965 and is Clairol’s largest hair color brand with approximately 9.6 percent dollar share of the category, according to Information Resources Inc. It is the third best-selling hair color, behind L’Oréal Preference and L’Oréal Excellence. Nice ’n Easy generated more than $100 million in sales for 2002, excluding Wal-Mart.

Nice ’n Easy retails for approximately $7.