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Costume Institute Taps Kidman

NEW YORK — For the opening of its "Goddess" exhibit in April, the Costume Institute has landed an appropriate benefit co-chair: Nicole Kidman.<br><br>The actress will join Gucci Group creative director Tom Ford and Vogue editor in chief Anna...

NEW YORK — For the opening of its “Goddess” exhibit in April, the Costume Institute has landed an appropriate benefit co-chair: Nicole Kidman.

This story first appeared in the December 16, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The actress will join Gucci Group creative director Tom Ford and Vogue editor in chief Anna Wintour as co-chairs of the annual Costume Institute benefit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on April 28, which will preview the May 1 opening of its “Goddess” show. The exhibit will examine the influence of classical dress on art and fashion throughout history, from ancient Greece to Madame Grès’ draping to Versace loincloths, and might even include a look or two from Kidman’s personal wardrobe.

“I feel that this year’s exhibition will be both impressive and thought-provoking, and look forward to co-chairing the benefit gala with Anna and Nicole,” Ford said.

At the premiere of “Chicago” on Friday, Kidman, who was wearing an elaborate necklace from her personal collection of antique jewelry, said, “Anna asked me to, and I love the idea of supporting fashion as it relates to art.”

One dress the museum’s curators are pursuing is the gold John Galliano gown that Kidman wore to the Academy Awards in 2000.

The event and exhibition are being sponsored by Gucci, with additional support from Condé Nast.

Among the plans for the show, Harold Koda, curator in charge of the Costume Institute, is organizing clothes and accessories from the Empire and Directoire periods as examples of explicit classicism, which will be displayed alongside works by Nattier, David, Ingres and Prud’hon. Designs of the 20th century will then be juxtaposed with costumes created for Isadora Duncan’s dance performances and from films including “Medea” and “One Touch of Venus.”