By  on April 7, 2005

NEW YORK — Is Stanislas de Quercize, Cartier’s energetic North American president and chief executive officer, saying goodbye to New York and bonjour to Paris?

A source close to Compagnie Financière Richemont SA, which owns Cartier, said the luxury conglomerate is in talks to move de Quercize to Paris to head up Richemont’s Van Cleef & Arpels, worldwide, as ceo. Frédéric de Narp, general director of Cartier in Italy, is said to be a front-runner to run Cartier in the U.S.

At Van Cleef, de Quercize would replace Isabelle Guichot, who left the jewelry firm last January to join Gucci Group, where she now serves as ceo of Sergio Rossi.

De Quercize was in Geneva at the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie watch show and couldn’t be reached for comment Wednesday. But it’s understood an announcement could come within the next week.

De Quercize joined Cartier in the U.S. in 2002. A Richemont veteran, he came to New York after a three-year stint as president of Cartier France. Before that, he had held several positions within Richemont, including president and ceo of Montblanc North America from 1994 to 1997 and international director of marketing for Alfred Dunhill until 1999.

As a brand, Van Cleef & Arpels is much smaller than Cartier, which fuels Richemont’s growth and has an estimated sales volume of $600 million in the U.S. alone. However, de Quercize would steer Van Cleef’s global direction and growth.

Last December, Van Cleef & Arpels launched its latest collection, called Couture, which draws from the Twenties for inspiration with fashion details such as lace, embroidery, ribbons, tassels and buttons in precious metals and gemstones. It also just opened a store on Bond Street in London designed by Anouska Hempel.

Richemont also owns brands such as Panerai, Baume & Mercier, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Piaget, Vacheron Constantin, Chloé and Shanghai Tang.

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