Paper Denim & Cloth is going beyond jeans.

The New York-based brand that has become well known for its high-end jeans line will branch into a full line of sportswear. While a small collection is in select stores now, Scott Morrison, vice president and designer, said a larger collection will hit for fall retailing.

While the company has been offering vintage-inspired T-shirts since it launched about three years ago, Morrison said the sportswear collection will include jackets, vests, woven shirts for men and women and a tunic dress, as well as a larger range of fits and styles in twill bottoms.

“The concept of creating vintage-looking pieces with updated silhouettes remains the focus of the line,” Morrison said. “In all our new styles, we continue our innovation in washes and hand abrasion as done on the denim.?We also developed a new vegetable dye program for our twills to achieve color variation and imperfection, which ties in perfectly to the overall vintage feel of the brand.”

The Paper brand is owned by junior resource Mudd Inc.

In addition to launching the new collection, the company is bringing back Alex Gilbert, who started the brand with Morrison in 1999 and will head up the new sportswear line. Alex Gilbert is the daughter of Mudd president Dick Gilbert.

“She has a similar vision which incorporates classic styles that transcend seasons, exceptional product quality and attention to detail,” Morrison said. “She will be adding a wide range of twill fabrics for skirts and pants, as well as a variety of knitwear and outerwear.”

The company’s jeans range from around $68 to $90 wholesale, so the sportswear will follow the same price range. Twill shorts, skirts and jackets range from $54 to $180. Woven shirts range from $78 to $88. T-shirts and polo shirts range from $18 to $35.

Morrison said the line will be sold to the high-end boutiques and department stores.

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