WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/fal-lands-some-prime-property-750119/

NEW YORK — Fashion Active Lab has a new home on Park Avenue.

This story first appeared in the September 26, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The athletic-inspired line’s first concept shop has opened at Linda Dresner’s Park Avenue store. Located on the shop’s second floor, the 400-square-foot space features FAL’s relaxed looks in high-end fabrics, such as cashmere and Italian wools.

“I’m interested in trends, but not trendy clothes,” said designer Jeffrey Grubb, who got into the women’s business in 1999. “FAL’s clothing works from the inside out, like yoga. Its design has captured refinement and elegance that does not scream gear.”

Set against a stark interior with blanched hardwood floors — similar to FAL’s showroom at 499 Seventh Avenue here — the collection consists of V-neck tops, relaxed pants, thermal underwear-type tops, cropped jackets, duster sweaters, lightweight tanks, a faux-shearling jacket and T-shirts with slashed necklines. Grubb is known for updating knitwear by using featherweight cashmere, as well as other plies, for casual versatile pieces designed to be stowed away in suitcases for wrinkle-free travel. For her part, Dresner said she tends to be drawn to lines like FAL that are inspired by the colors of nature.

FAL’s black label wholesales for $17 to $180, and its white label wholesales in the $50 to $330 price range. Both lines have versatile, relaxed styles, with the higher-priced items being made of cashmere as opposed to blends.

To mark Grubb’s new Upper East Side outpost and celebrate its understated style, Wallpaper magazine and the designer hosted a fashion show earlier this month at Dresner’s store. Despite his low-key style, Grubb recognizes the potential in this venture and the firm is considering opening additional concept shops.