Farewell to Cummings, Hello to Buccellati

Angela Cummings’ send-off.

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NEW YORK — It was a send-off worthy of a legend, and many would argue that’s exactly what Angela Cummings is in the jewelry world.

This story first appeared in the June 16, 2003 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

Earlier this month, Michele Ateyeh, president and chief executive officer of Angela Cummings Inc., and the jewelry designer celebrated Cummings’ 35 years in the jewelry business and her namesake firm’s closure with an event at the Grill Room in Manhattan’s Four Seasons restaurant.

Despite the gloomy weather, more than 400 retail executives, designers, clients and friends of Cummings crowded the room to wish the two well-liked industry figures well in their new endeavors.

“It’s great to have everyone in one room,” said Cummings, whose company will officially close on June 30. Cummings will move with her husband, Bruce, to an area outside Park City, Utah.

The well-wishers included Burt Tansky of Neiman Marcus, Ron Frasch of Bergdorf Goodman, consultants Philip Miller and Dawn Mello, Lambertson Truex design duo John Truex and Richard Lambertson, along with Robert Lee Morris and Elsa Klensch.

“Angela Cummings has been an amazing success story at Bergdorf Goodman for so many years,” said Muriel Gonzalez, senior vice president and general merchandise manager at Bergdorf’s, where Cummings had a boutique. “We salute her for being so courageous to do something different and exciting and new with her life, though we will miss her terribly.”

The following evening, a crowd braved stormy weather for a cocktail party at Bergdorf’s to view an exhibition of new and vintage collections from Buccellati, the upscale Italian jewelry firm. The event celebrated the new Buccellati book by Assouline which showcases the company’s creations over the last 250 years.

Among those in the crowd were Howard Hyde, Buccellati’s vice president of global marketing, as well as socialites Violaine Burnback and Rosalyn Whitehead, furrier Dennis Basso and members of the Buccellati family, who are still at the helm of the company, which dates back to 1740.

“People are more and more sophisticated now,” said Gianmaria Buccellati, the company’s owner and president, who was busily signing copies of the book. “And they want more sophisticated products.”

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