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Fashion Scoops: All Fired Up … It’s A Deal … Real Bitches …

ALL FIRED UP: After showing their collections, some designers might wish they had done things differently. Not "P. Diddy" Combs, who presented his collection on Saturday night. "I would have still fired Lori Goldstein," he insisted, of the...

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ALL FIRED UP: After showing their collections, some designers might wish they had done things differently. Not “P. Diddy” Combs, who presented his collection on Saturday night. “I would have still fired Lori Goldstein,” he insisted, of the high-profile stylist he axed when she offered an opinion different from his own. Strolling into the Marc Jacobs show, he said, “I wouldn’t have changed a thing.”

IT’S A DEAL: If Calvin Klein and Barry Schwartz ever harbored dreams of going public, that wish becomes a reality today…sort of. Phillips-Van Heusen, a publicly traded firm, officially closes its deal to buy Calvin Klein Inc. today, two days earlier than recently speculated. CKI will become a subsidiary of PVH, and its net and revenues will now be incorporated into PVH’s quarterly results.

PVH bought CKI for $430 million up front, with additional payouts of as much as $270 million in the coming years. And partners Klein and Schwartz will receive shares representing a 4.4 percent stake in PVH. The transaction includes a nine-year warrant in favor of Klein to purchase 320,000 shares of PVH common stock at $28 a share, as reported. And there is still the possibility the PVH moniker could be changed to Calvin Klein, which has the higher brand name recognition.

REAL BITCHES: Fashion week isn’t the only show in town. A gentler, more refined display is taking place right down the street at Madison Square Garden: The Westminster Kennel Club’s dog show.

The barking models are as international as any supermodel lineup at Bryant Park, ranging from Alaskan Malamutes and American Eskimo dogs to Australian terriers, French bulldogs and Portuguese water dogs — whatever those are. If only the United Nations could coexist as happily.

On Monday, the majority of dogs wore nothing but their natural fur (no PETA, thank goodness), though some accessorized it with trendy beaded and bejeweled collars, or leopard-print sweaters. Vicki, a Yorkshire Terrier, wore a gold and red ribbon. “I make the bows, because it brings out their hair color,” noted Carol Huskey, Vicki’s owner, who’s clearly a bit of a frustrated fashion designer herself. “If you have dark gold hair, you need to wear red.”

As for hair trends, looks ranged from dreadlocks to curls, though stick-straight hair was the ’do-du-jour (think Condé Nast fashion editor to get the picture).

“It’s like a fashion show for dogs,” said Laura Wright, who accessorized her rottweiler with a turquoise beaded Native-American silver choker. “He also has a leopard-skin and polar fleece jacket,” she gushed. “That’s his going-to-New York coat. We wore it from the airport to the hotel. He’s into fashion. Look at him, how stylish is he?”

LVMH’S FRESHMAN CLASS: It wasn’t high society or low celebrities who ruled the front row at DKNY on Monday, but rather the freshman class of LVMH University. Donna Karan International’s new chief executive, Fred Wilson, packed in not only his own recruits, but also the new U.S. business heads of Fendi and Marc Jacobs: François Kress, who was installed as president of Fendi last year, and Jeffry Aronsson, the newly appointed ceo of Marc Jacobs. They filled a section, along with DKI execs Melissa Parker-Lilly, president of Donna Karan New York, and Tisha Kalberer, chief financial and administrative officer. Taking the center seat was Yves Carcelle, chief executive of Louis Vuitton and head of LVMH’s fashion and leather goods business group.

But the freshmen didn’t make it the whole way through the day. By the time of the Marc Jacobs show later that night, Aronsson’s only companion beyond the throng of starlets was Carcelle. Were the others in bed — or, like all freshmen, partying the night away?

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