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Fashion Scoops: Homecoming … Where’s the Beef … Building Support

HOMECOMING: Could Andrea Pinto, who recently tendered his resignation at Nina Ricci, be heading back to Krizia? Sources in Italy said Pinto, who worked at the Milan-based house for almost a dozen years under his father, Krizia chairman Aldo Pinto,...

HOMECOMING: Could Andrea Pinto, who recently tendered his resignation at Nina Ricci, be heading back to Krizia? Sources in Italy said Pinto, who worked at the Milan-based house for almost a dozen years under his father, Krizia chairman Aldo Pinto, will start next month in a senior management role. A fashion veteran, Pinto Junior worked five years as managing director of Mila Schon after leaving Krizia. He had joined Nina Ricci as president last October.

This story first appeared in the June 25, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

WHERE’S THE BEEF?: There was high drama at DB Thursday night, with two editors in chief sharing the dining room — or, at least, trying to share it. Vogue’s Anna Wintour arrived first, with a friend, and was promptly escorted to a plum table in the back. When Harper’s Bazaar’s Glenda Bailey arrived a few minutes later with a posse that included former Vogue shutterbug Roxanne Lowitt, the group was brought to a table in the only slightly less desirable front room. Bailey complained, and so did Lowitt — but to no avail. (Meanwhile, Wintour enjoyed her DB burger, no bun.)

BUILDING SUPPORT: Eagle-eyed garmentos have recently noticed a mysterious message spray-painted on one of the upper girders of a building being erected on Seventh Avenue near 41st Street that reads, “Thank you, Ellen Tracy.” No, it’s not admiration from a potential suitor, but rather acknowledgement of a donation made by Ellen Tracy employees to help with the medical expenses of a construction worker who was injured on the site last week. A spokeswoman for the firm said its staff had collected about $1,000 for the man, thus prompting the thanks.”