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Fashion Scoops: Notable Store… Ricci’s Redux… Nesting…

Maurice Ohayon, the designer and owner of Notify jeans, has a knack for selecting great dance partners. After teaming with Karl Lagerfeld to design the K Karl Lagerfeld denim line, Ohayon tapped architect Zaha Hadid to create his first store.

NOTABLE STORE: Maurice Ohayon, the designer and owner of Notify jeans, has a knack for selecting great dance partners. After teaming with Karl Lagerfeld to design the K Karl Lagerfeld denim line, Ohayon tapped architect Zaha Hadid to create his first store. Slated to open soon near the Place du Marche Saint Honoré, the store will act as an atelier, where visitors can sneak a look at exclusive denims being designed.

RICCI’S REDUX: Christina Ricci has a passion for vintage. “I view fashion as art,” said the pint-sized actress, who co-hosted the launch party for Samsonite’s Fashionaire collection at the Gramercy Park Hotel on Thursday night. “Wearing Madame Grès is like wearing a museum piece.” Putting her money where her mouth is, Ricci accessorized her Sophia Kokosalaki cocktail dress with vintage Jean Schlumberger designed Tiffany & Co. bracelets. Ricci brought her own creative team to her shoot, as she’s featured in the company’s global relations campaign for the vintage-inspired line.

Vintage clothing maven Cameron Silver, who collaborated on the line, flew in for the event along with Samsonite creative director Quentin Mackay. Marissa Tomei and Gina Gershon also stopped by to ogle the goods and talk to Mackay. “I like having designer friends. I say I like something, and they design it and give it to me. But if someone asked me to design luggage, I think I would really enjoy it,” said Gershon, who is a busy bee. She is working on a CD and just finished a teen novel with her brother and has even dabbled in accessories design before. She designed a case for her favorite instrument — the Jew’s harp. “It didn’t really come out right,” she said. “The proportions were all wrong. I’m still on the quest for the perfect Jew’s harp case.”

NESTING: Fashion and art met at the Nest Foundation benefit and silent auction last Wednesday night as Cynthia Rowley, Zac Posen, Sari Gueron, Richard Chai, Benjamin Cho and Charlotte Ronson crowded into Chelsea’s Emergency Arts gallery. Susan Sarandon hosted the event for the nascent foundation — which is raising money for a residential facility in Austin, Tex., to house children who are victims of commercial sexual exploitation. Among the artists (many of whom were in attendance) who donated works to the event were Dash Snow, Adam McEwen, Rita Ackerman, Jeff Koons, Nan Goldin, Will Cotton and Matthew Barney, along with fashion snappers Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin, Mario Sorrenti, Sante D’Orazio, Craig McDean and Terry Richardson — who himself won big bidding on a work by Nate Lowman. Meanwhile, Ivanka Trump, Amanda Hearst, Eleanor Ylvisaker and Arden Wohl toasted co-chair Stella Schnabel‘s 24th birthday and her brother Vito got himself a Dan Colen piece as a present.

This story first appeared in the April 2, 2007 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

CORAL CONSERVATION: SeaWeb, an organization dedicated to promoting ocean conservation, brought the issue of the depletion of the world’s coral reefs to the attention of retailers such as Fortunoff, Barneys New York, Mikimoto and Buccellati during a breakfast last Thursday at Tiffany & Co. “Coral is so popular in jewelry, fashion and home decor,” said Patty Debenham, director of coral programs at SeaWeb. “We can work with the leaders in the jewelry and fashion industries so that they can create products that conserve the oceans.”

Debenham said 11 percent of the world’s coral reefs has been lost and another 30 percent will disappear in the next 30 years if coral consumption doesn’t decrease. “For some companies, coral isn’t a huge percentage of their sales,” Debenham said, adding that products representative of coral can be made using silver or crystal. “Maybe Mikimoto could create a piece that has a pearl and also represents coral,” she said, adding, “pearls need healthy oceans to grow.”

Tiffany stopped using coral five years ago. Its foundation has given SeaWeb a grant to spread its message.