WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/fgi-talks-generational-marketing-731286/
government-trade
government-trade

FGI Talks Generational Marketing

NEW YORK — Some of beauty’s top brass gathered for a luncheon panel on multigenerational marketing at the Waldorf Astoria last Friday.<br><br>The event, put on by Fashion Group International and moderated by Carol Smith, senior vice...

NEW YORK — Some of beauty’s top brass gathered for a luncheon panel on multigenerational marketing at the Waldorf Astoria last Friday.

This story first appeared in the May 16, 2003 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The event, put on by Fashion Group International and moderated by Carol Smith, senior vice president and group publishing director of Elle, featured Dan Brestle, group president of the Estée Lauder Cos.; Marc Pritchard, vice president of global cosmetics and personal care for Procter & Gamble; Joseph Horowitz, president and chief executive of Clarins Group USA; Lyn Kirby, president and ceo of Ulta, and Kate Oldham, divisional merchandise manager at Saks Fifth Avenue.

Horowitz and Pritchard were confident they could meet the needs of consumers across a wide range of age groups by employing diversified offerings within their extensive Clarins and Cover Girl brands. On the other hand, Brestle, who oversees a portfolio of highly specialized Lauder brands, including Bumble and bumble, Stila and Bobbi Brown, was of the philosophy that satisfying the needs of consumers of all ages is not so easy.

Asked if a brand can be all things to all people, Brestle remarked, “No, you really can’t. But two brands that come close are Cover Girl and Clinique.” Clinique never promised any specific benefit to young consumers and never over promised mature consumers, according to Brestle, who worked on the brand as a senior executive for a number of years.