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Givenchy’s “Irresistible” Campaign

NEW YORK — Coming soon to a TV screen and a magazine near you: a movie-like advertising campaign for the new Very Irresistible Givenchy — starring actress Liv Tyler. <br><br>The print ad resembles a movie poster, featuring a close-up...

NEW YORK — Coming soon to a TV screen and a magazine near you: a movie-like advertising campaign for the new Very Irresistible Givenchy — starring actress Liv Tyler.

This story first appeared in the July 25, 2003 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

The print ad resembles a movie poster, featuring a close-up portrait of Liv Tyler with a tag line that reads: “Givenchy presents Liv Tyler in Very Irresistible Givenchy…The new feminine fragrance….Very elegante, very fun, very you…”

The TV commercial is shot to resemble a movie trailer, with Tyler gallivanting through Paris — whistling for a taxi, playing pool and driving in a convertible. Both ads are in black and white with the hot-pink fragrance bottle providing the only pop of color.

Alain Crevet, president and chief executive officer of Parfums Givenchy worldwide, and Isabelle Gex, vice president of worldwide marketing for Parfums Givenchy, teamed up with the brand’s ad agency, DDB Louis XIV; famed photographer Mario Testino, and Nicolas Degennes, artistic director for makeup and color cosmetics for Parfums Givenchy, to put the campaign together.

The team was aiming for a look that incorporated both the brand’s heritage and a fresh cinematic look, reminiscent of Givenchy’s classic ads with its first muse, Audrey Hepburn, noted Gex. “This campaign represents a going forward, a new era for Parfums Givenchy with a very modern and young style,” she said. “Liv Tyler is a rock ’n’ roll girl, and the style of the photo looks very fresh and new. The young generation should be fans of this new, creative and original campaign. The values that this campaign communicates are eternal elegance and modern spontaneity.”

While Givenchy hasn’t had an actress as a spokesperson since Hepburn, the decision was made to go in that direction, said Gex, because “an American film star with global recognition offers continuity and fidelity to Givenchy’s roots.” Tyler was a logical choice, she said, because “she reminds us of Audrey Hepburn — she epitomizes American spontaneity and French elegance, and she is modern, irresistible and an ingenue.”

The fragrance, noted Vicky Neilson, vice president of marketing for Parfums Givenchy Inc., the brand’s North American arm, is intended to appeal to consumers 25 to 49 years old, with a special emphasis on those in the 25- to 35-year-old range.

The print ads will break in the U.S. in September women’s, entertainment and general interest magazines including In Style, Marie Claire, Elle and Vanity Fair. TV, in the U.S., will be limited to the holiday period and is expected to begin running around Dec. 15. While none of the executives would comment on projected advertising spending, industry sources estimated that about $5 million would be spent in the U.S. during the launch period, and that between $15 million and $20 million would be spent globally in the same period.

The next project for Tyler and Givenchy: a new color cosmetics line, set to bow in Japan in November. Its launch date in other markets is still to be determined.