WWD.com/fashion-news/fashion-features/hooray-for-hollywood-blvd-1172815/
government-trade
government-trade

Hooray for Hollywood Blvd.

<?XML:NAMESPACE PREFIX = CS /><CS:BOLD>THE WALK OF FAME IS STILL HERE, AS ARE A FEW SEEDY SHOPS AND COLORFUL CHARACTERS, BUT THE CITY HAS FINALLY SUCCEEDED IN REVIVING THE BOULEVARD'S MOVIE-STAR GLAM. FOR THOSE IN THE KNOW, THERE'S A GOOD MEASURE OF...

THE WALK OF FAME IS STILL HERE, AS ARE A FEW SEEDY SHOPS AND COLORFUL CHARACTERS, BUT THE CITY HAS FINALLY SUCCEEDED IN REVIVING THE BOULEVARD’S MOVIE-STAR GLAM. FOR THOSE IN THE KNOW, THERE’S A GOOD MEASURE OF HIP AND CHIC AMID THE NEON SIGNS AND CHAIN STORES.

ARTS & CRAFTS

The American Cinemateque at the Egyptian Theatre (6712 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-466-FILM) A few doors down from the restored Disney’s El Capitan Theatre, the restored Egyptian is home to the American Cinemateque, a group promoting and preserving our film heritage. Screenings are often accompanied by actor/director lectures. On tap during market week: a Stanley Kubrick tribute, Jan. 11-19. Cineasts should also schedule a stop at the Hollywood History Museum (1666 North Highland Avenue, 323-464-7776). Inside the Max Factor building, you’ll find four floors of vintage costumes, props and memorabilia from films, television, stage and music. Afterward, grab a bite at Chasen’s Hollywood Cafe, the new outpost of the now-closed Beverly Hills classic. Onstage spectacles more your style? The newly restored Pantages Theater (6233 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-468-1770) houses Disney’s magnificent “Lion King.” Book ahead; it’s one of the hottest shows in town. Or cool off in the pool at the Roosevelt Hotel (7000 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-466-7000), one of the best sneak-in spots in town. The grand hotel, opened in 1927, played host to the first Academy Awards two years later. Today, it’s been restored to its Spanish Colonial splendor.

For culture vultures, the multimedia art gallery L.A. Contemporary Exhibitions (6522 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-957-1777) showcases Kenny Scharf and photographer Daniel Marlos in the back. Would-be hecklers should head for Improv Olympic West (6366 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-962-7560). The sibling of Chicago’s 20-year-old comedy club, which spawned the careers of Andy Dick, Tina Fay and Tim Meadows, among others, is doing brisk business since opening three months ago. Still further along on the cultural spectrum is the Frederick’s of Hollywood Lingerie Museum (6608 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-466-8506). This lingerie legend has wisely preserved its history in a chock-full free museum in the back. See Marilyn Monroe’s feathered negligee from “Let’s Make Love” and Lana Turner’s bustier from “The Merry Widow,” along with Madonna’s cone-shaped corset.

EATS AND DRINKS

The Pig ‘N’ Whistle (6714 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-463-0000) combines Roaring Twenties decor with trendy fare like tuna tartare and crab cakes. After 9 p.m., the back room becomes NuBar, complete with a queen-sized bed for true lounging around. At another Twenties-style boite, the Frolic Room (6245 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-625-890), the wallpaper may be a bit faded, but the establishment hasn’t lost any of its zing. Getting into Deep (1707 North Vine, 323-462-1144): Before the year-old club appeared in the film “Ocean’s Eleven,” it was where Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe hung out. The upscale restaurant/nightclub is a 5,000-square-foot ode to voyeurism. One-way reflective glass that encloses the dance floor lets people on the inside see only their reflections, a glass ceiling showcases a menage a trois of dancers writhing above and several VIP rooms feature closed-circuit club monitors. Socialize and accessorize at Star Shoes 6364 (Hollywood Boulevard, 323-462-7827). This elegant Fifties-era shoe salon/bar sells vintage La Rose footwear, complete with all the shoe store trappings. A back room contains dancing and private parties. Finally, the stretch known as the Cahuenga Corridor is home to several hot spots, including: The Room (1626 North Cahuenga Boulevard, 323-462-7196), an unmarked, alleyway bar that’s a hideout for those in the know; the Burgundy Room (1621 North Cahuenga Boulevard, 323-465-7530), known for its sangria and a vast selection of New Wave hits, and The Hotel Cafe (1623 North Cahuenga Boulevard, 323-461-2040), where the late-night crowd munches on grilled veggie sandwiches and grooves to a fully loaded juke box.

BEAUTY AND THE BOUTIQUES

Lady Studio Exotic Shoes (6500 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-461-1765) is a shoe fetishist’s dream, stocking thousands of stilettos, lace-ups and platform boots. Playmate’s (6438 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-464-7636) specializes in the sort of frilly unmentionables that Frederick’s of Hollywood used to be known for. Edgy boutique Blest (1634 North Cahuenga Boulevard, 323-467-0191) offers one-offs and limited-edition clothes from local talents Kate O’Connor, Corey Lynn Calter and Shawn. Just down the block, designer Rick Owens’s duds are a study in faded glamour. (By appointment only; 1639 North Las Palmas Avenue, 323-461-8620).

Hollywood Tattoo (6317 Hollywood Boulevard, 323-464-9938) is where many locals got their first ink, way back in the Eighties. The risk-averse may want to stick with the martini and manicure combo at Beauty Bar (1638 North Cahuenga Boulevard, 323-464-7676), the Los Angeles cousin of the San Francisco and New York night spots. Just watch the polish when you rock out. The masses are storming cult skin care purveyor Lather (6801 Hollywood Boulevard, Suite 223, 323-962-6070), at its location in the Hollywood & Highland mega mall (see story on page 30). The shop offers custom blending for lotions, soaps and hair tonics.