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In Brief

FIT SHOP RETURNS: The Fashion Institute of Technology is reopening its student-run Style Shop Monday. The Shop, which bowed in 1996, was designed to give students the experience of running a business. The store sells a mix of accessories, home goods,...

FIT SHOP RETURNS: The Fashion Institute of Technology is reopening its student-run Style Shop Monday. The Shop, which bowed in 1996, was designed to give students the experience of running a business. The store sells a mix of accessories, home goods, apparel, cosmetics and bath products designed by students, faculty, staff and alumni. It is operated by student members of the Merchandising Society, who learn skills in buying, merchandising, product development, marketing, finance planning, customer relations, sales and management by running the boutique. Located in the David Dubinsky Student Center at Seventh Avenue and 27th Street, the shop’s grand-reopening celebration will take place from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Monday. Throughout the semester, hours are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday and Fridays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

LIBERTY’S NEW MAN: Iain Renwick has been named chief executive of Liberty, the London specialty store, with the mission of restoring the store to profitability. He succeeds Fiona Harrison, who left the firm. Renwick, 44, previously was with Imagination Ltd., the design and creative agency. Before that, he was marketing director of Habitat, working closely with Vittorio Radice, who would later turn around Selfridges. “Liberty is now well placed to become London’s leading destination, design-led store,” Renwick said in a statement. In the fiscal year ending June 29, Liberty posted losses of $24 million on sales of $70.2 million, having suffered from the drop-off in sales following Sept. 11. Liberty also said in a statement that Lucille Lewin, cofounder of the Whistles fashion group, has joined the store as creative director.

NORTHERN LIGHTS: H&M is about to get a run for its money on its home turf. Its fast-fashion rival, Spain’s Zara, plans to open its first store in Sweden, a 16,000-square-foot unit in central Stockholm. The store is slated to open next year.