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In Brief

EU LAUNDRY LIST: A draft of potential U.S. products that could be hit with punitive European Union duties is being circulated among EU members, and it includes man-made and cotton apparel and textiles. The draft, sent Tuesday to EU members, is a...

EU LAUNDRY LIST: A draft of potential U.S. products that could be hit with punitive European Union duties is being circulated among EU members, and it includes man-made and cotton apparel and textiles. The draft, sent Tuesday to EU members, is a laundry list of U.S. exports drawn up two years ago when Europeans first challenged a U.S. export tax subsidy at the World Trade Organization. The list then, and now, is being used as a basis to create a final list for retaliatory tariffs. Two years ago, the EU delayed retaliation over the U.S. tax, which the WTO has deemed to be in violation of the global trade body’s rules as an illegal subsidy. EU leaders have expressed exasperation that Congress hasn’t yet revoked the tax, although lawmakers say they plan to do so.

This story first appeared in the September 11, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

FILLING A GAP: Bob Martin, former president and chief executive of Wal-Mart Stores’ International division, has been added to the Gap Inc.’s board of directors, returning the group to the 12-person configuration it had in 2000. During a 15-year tenure at Wal-Mart, Martin also served as its chief information officer. A Gap spokesman said that the San Francisco-based firm’s board has fluctuated between 10 and 12 members since 1999.

CORD’S NEW HOME: As he transitions into using his new name, Barry Kieselstein-Cord — soon to be known professionally and personally as Barry Cord — is also beginning a new identity as a retailer. The accessories designer is putting the finishing touches on his first company-owned store on West Broadway between Prince and Houston Streets in the former Rizzoli Bookstore space. It will have a soft opening early next week. Although he is changing his name to make it roll off the tongue a little easier, the store will carry the somewhat cumbersome moniker Barry Cord Kieselstein-Cord. The ground floor of the 5,000-square-foot space will showcase eyewear, jewelry, belts, bags and luggage, while the top floor will carry home furnishings and a fine art gallery, complete with its own curator.