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MILLS MAN: The Mills Corp. has named Jim Napoli president of the operating division to direct all leasing activities and oversee the management of operating centers. The position is new, and includes responsibilities that were held by Judith Berson, executive vice president of leasing, who retired this month. Napoli will be responsible for broadening the base of tenancies in traditional Mills centers and emerging international and mixed-used developments and streamlining the company’s operating properties. Napoli was executive vice president of leasing at Simon Property Group, where he headed leasing and other functions since 1989. Before that, he worked at May Centers Inc. and Jim Wilson & Associates.

This story first appeared in the August 13, 2002 issue of WWD.  Subscribe Today.

TARGET SITE: Target Corp. has revamped its Web site to include merchandise offerings from Target and its sister chains Marshall Field’s and Mervyn’s, as well as Amazon.com. The new site, target.com, is powered by Amazon. “The relaunch of Target.com is the first time that Amazon has provided an end-to-end e-commerce platform solution at a totally separate URL,” said a spokeswoman for Amazon.com. Target.com shoppers will now be able to access, search and shop from all four sites under one umbrella.

JOSEPH TO MADISON: Joseph, the European designer brand, has signed a 10-year lease for 2,300 square feet of space at 816 Madison Avenue, according to real estate firms Cushman & Wakefield and McDevitt Co. The space has been occupied by Dolce & Gabbana and Joan & David. Joseph plans to consolidate its two Madison Avenue locations, at 796 and 804 Madison, to the new address, C&W noted. The store is set to open in November. Joseph also has a store in SoHo, at 106 Green Street. Alan Napack, a director at C&W, and Scott Schuster, a vice president at McDevitt, jointly represented Joseph. Harvey Clarke of AJ Clarke represented the owner.

ACCOUNTING RECOUNT: Cutter & Buck Inc. reported Monday that an internal investigation has turned up accounting irregularities related to consignment shipments for fiscal 2000 and 2001 and that Stephen Lowber resigned Friday as chief financial officer. Chief executive Fran Conley said in a statement that the Seattle-based sportswear marketer will restate its audited financial statements for the years ended April 30, 2000, and April 30, 2001 to correct entries of sales into incorrect periods and inaccurate reporting of sales by distribution channels. While the matter is still under review, Conley added that Cutter & Buck has no reason to believe that the firm’s current net worth or its sales totals for the past three years will be affected.