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In Brief: Nolan Hire… Talbots Promotion… Set In Stone

Sharilyn Niehaus has joined Charles Nolan as vice president of sales. Previously, Niehaus was a senior account executive at Anne Klein, which she joined in 2004.

NOLAN HIRE: Sharilyn Niehaus has joined Charles Nolan as vice president of sales. Previously, Niehaus was a senior account executive at Anne Klein, which she joined in 2004. Nolan was the designer for the sportswear brand from 2001 to 2003. Before joining Anne Klein, Niehaus was merchandising director at Jones Apparel Group Canada. At Charles Nolan, she will manage the wholesale business and report directly to the designer.

TALBOTS PROMOTION: The Talbots Inc. promoted John Fiske 3rd to senior vice president of human resources, overseeing operations for the Talbots and J. Jill brands. Fiske, 42, held the same title at J. Jill, which Talbots acquired in May. He succeeds Stu Stolper, who is retiring. Before joining J. Jill, Fiske was vice president of human resources at Abercrombie & Fitch. Fiske also held similar positions at Kenneth Cole Productions and the Timberland Co.

SET IN STONE: Phillips-Van Heusen Corp. made a $500,000 contribution to the Ellis Island Ferry Building restoration, and the company’s name will appear on a permanent plaque that commemorates the completion of the project. The Ferry Building reopened to the public on April 2 after being closed for more than 50 years. The restoration project was funded by a combination of federal, Hudson County and New Jersey state funds and private financing. Emanuel Chirico, PVH’s chief executive officer, attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony in honor of the company’s Arrow brand. At the event, Save Ellis Island unveiled its first exhibition in the restored Ferry Building, “Future in the Balance: Immigrants, Public Health and Ellis Island’s Hospitals.” The exhibit, which opens to the public on April 24, explains the history of Ellis Island’s U.S. Public Health Service hospital from the perspectives of the immigrant patients, doctors, nurses, military personnel and support staff that populated the buildings between 1901 and 1954.