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NEW YORK — Asking fashion editors and stylists to name their favorite brands — without compromising their editorial objectivity — can be dicey, but when it comes to denim, diversity apparently rules.<br><br>Today, women are choosing...

NEW YORK — Asking fashion editors and stylists to name their favorite brands — without compromising their editorial objectivity — can be dicey, but when it comes to denim, diversity apparently rules.

Today, women are choosing jeans that fit their personalities and their lifestyles. While tighter seems to be better, the five fashionistas WWD interviewed were in agreement that unwashed denim is about as current as a 1987 Lacroix pouf dress.

Regina Teplitsky, fashion director for Seventeen magazine, said she has grown tired of the hot Seven Jeans, which she said she likes a lot but have “been so copied that now, you not only have too many girls in Seven walking around, you also have a hundred brands that look just like them.” Teplitsky prefers Marc by Marc Jacobs. Her favorites are the white jeans with red trim up the side.

Mimi Shin, accessories director for Harper’s Bazaar, is also a Marc girl, but she prefers the blue, pleated, acid-wash jeans.

Freelance stylist Samira Nasr goes for faded blue Balenciaga jeans that flow over her high heels.

Celebrity hairstylist Sally Hershberger — who has made over some of America’s best-known blondes, including Meg Ryan (perky to sexy), Courtney Love (heroin unchic to vroom-vroom Versace) and Hillary Clinton (dowdy first lady to sleek senator) — goes for her vintage Levi’s. But don’t be fooled: Hershberger gets her denim fix at Fred Segal, where the Beverly Hills merchant customizes her vintage jeans by cutting the top off the waistline, Mariah Carey style.

Tamara Rappa, a senior fashion editor for Cosmopolitan, likes it as American as apple pie. She can’t seem to get enough denim — so much that she decided to incorporate it into her contemporary sportswear line, Farooqui and Tamara, for the first time.

Rappa’s favorite jeans are Gap’s long-and-lean style, a classic blue boot-cut, which unlike the company’s stock portfolio, never seems to go out of style.